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Twin differences in birth weight: The effects of genotype and prenatal environment on neonatal and post-neonatal mortality

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  • Conley, Dalton
  • Strully, Kate W.
  • Bennett, Neil G.

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  • Conley, Dalton & Strully, Kate W. & Bennett, Neil G., 2006. "Twin differences in birth weight: The effects of genotype and prenatal environment on neonatal and post-neonatal mortality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 151-183, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:4:y:2006:i:2:p:151-183
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeffrey Kallan, 1993. "Race, intervening variables, and two components of low birth weight," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(3), pages 489-506, August.
    2. Orley Ashenfelter & Cecilia Rouse, 1998. "Income, Schooling, and Ability: Evidence from a New Sample of Identical Twins," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(1), pages 253-284.
    3. W. Frisbie & Douglas Forbes & Starling Pullum, 1996. "Compromised birth outcomes and infant mortality among racial and ethnic groups," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(4), pages 469-481, November.
    4. Jere R. Behrman & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2004. "Returns to Birthweight," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 586-601, May.
    5. Behrman, Jere R & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Taubman, Paul, 1994. "Endowments and the Allocation of Schooling in the Family and in the Marriage Market: The Twins Experiment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1131-1174, December.
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