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Is it protestant tradition or current protestant population that affects corruption?

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  • Gokcekus, Omer

Abstract

The percentage of Protestants 100Â years ago has a more significant impact on today's level of corruption than the current percentage of Protestants within a country. This supports Williamson [Williamson, O.E., 2000. The new institutional economics: taking stock, looking ahead, Journal of Economic Literature XXXVIII, 595-613]'s claim that religion is at Level-1 of social analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Gokcekus, Omer, 2008. "Is it protestant tradition or current protestant population that affects corruption?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 59-62, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:99:y:2008:i:1:p:59-62
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert, 1999. "The Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 222-279, April.
    2. Brunetti, Aymo & Weder, Beatrice, 2003. "A free press is bad news for corruption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(7-8), pages 1801-1824, August.
    3. Oliver E. Williamson, 2000. "The New Institutional Economics: Taking Stock, Looking Ahead," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 595-613, September.
    4. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Corrigenda [Introduction to the Economics of Religion]," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 1941-1941, December.
    5. Gokcekus, Omer & Knorich, Jan, 2006. "Does quality of openness affect corruption?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 190-196, May.
    6. repec:hrv:faseco:30747160 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Treisman, Daniel, 2000. "The causes of corruption: a cross-national study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 399-457, June.
    8. Chowdhury, Shyamal K., 2004. "The effect of democracy and press freedom on corruption: an empirical test," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 93-101, October.
    9. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Introduction to the Economics of Religion," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1465-1495, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Halkos, George E. & Tzeremes, Nickolaos G., 2014. "Public sector transparency and countries’ environmental performance: A nonparametric analysis," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 19-37.
    2. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "How does corruption influence perceptions of the risk of nuclear accidents?: cross-country analysis after the 2011 Fukushima disaster in Japan," MPRA Paper 31708, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. René Ruske, 2015. "Does Economics Make Politicians Corrupt? Empirical Evidence from the United States Congress," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 240-254, May.
    4. Halkos, George & Tzeremes, Nickolaos, 2011. "Investigating the cultural patterns of corruption: A nonparametric analysis," MPRA Paper 32546, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Laurent Weill & Christophe Godlewski, 2012. "Why Do Large Firms Go For Islamic Loans?," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2012-05, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.
    6. Eiji Yamamura, 2014. "Impact of natural disaster on public sector corruption," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(3), pages 385-405, December.
    7. Eiji Yamamura, 2013. "Public sector corruption and the probability of technological disasters," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 233-255, August.
    8. Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "Public policy, trust and growth: disclosure of government information in Japan," MPRA Paper 27703, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. George E. Halkos & Nickolaos G. Tzeremes, 2012. "The culture of corruption: A nonparametric analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(1), pages 315-324.
    10. repec:eee:soceco:v:69:y:2017:i:c:p:83-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Gokcekus, Omer & Suzuki, Yui, 2011. "Business cycle and corruption," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(2), pages 138-140, May.

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