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The analytics of seasonal migration


  • Stark, Oded
  • Fan, C. Simon


A framework that yields different possible patterns of migration as optimal solutions to a simple utility maximization problem is presented and explored. It is shown that seasonal migration arises as an optimal endogenous response to a comparison of costs (of living and of separation) and returns (to work) over a set of three alternative options, even if a year-long migration is feasible.
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Suggested Citation

  • Stark, Oded & Fan, C. Simon, 2007. "The analytics of seasonal migration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 304-312, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:94:y:2007:i:2:p:304-312

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. N. F. R. Crafts & C. K. Harley, 1992. "Output growth and the British industrial revolution: a restatement of the Crafts-Harley view," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 45(4), pages 703-730, November.
    2. Frenken, Koen & Saviotti, Paolo P. & Trommetter, Michel, 1999. "Variety and niche creation in aircraft, helicopters, motorcycles and microcomputers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 469-488, June.
    3. Alexander, Peter J., 1997. "Product variety and market structure: A new measure and a simple test," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 207-214, February.
    4. Stéphane Mussard & Michel Terraza & Françoise Seyte, 2003. "Decomposition of Gini and the generalized entropy inequality measures," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(7), pages 1-6.
    5. Bourguignon, Francois, 1979. "Decomposable Income Inequality Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 901-920, July.
    6. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:4:y:2003:i:7:p:1-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. James E. Foster & Artyom A. Shneyerov, 1999. "A general class of additively decomposable inequality measures," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 14(1), pages 89-111.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mario Liebensteiner, 2014. "Estimating the Income Gain of Seasonal Labor Migration," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 667-680, November.
    2. Igor Jakubiak, 2015. "Immigrants in the United Kingdom: wage gap and origin," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 43.
    3. C. Simon Fan & Oded Stark, 2011. "A Theory Of Migration As A Response To Occupational Stigma," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(2), pages 549-571, May.
    4. Kępińska, Ewa & Stark, Oded, 2013. "The evolution and sustainability of seasonal migration from Poland to Germany: From the dusk of the 19th century to the dawn of the 21st century," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 3-18.

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