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Immigrants in the United Kingdom: wage gap and origin

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  • Igor Jakubiak

Abstract

In this paper the size of immigrant wage gap in United Kingdom is compared between different countries of origin. Based on the data from Labour Force Survey, the wage differential was decomposed using Oaxaca-Blinder and Juhn-Murphy-Pierce methods. Results suggest, that the immigrant population is not homogenous. Classification, proposed in the paper, include highly developed, postcolonial, less- developed countries and new EU member states. The highest level of wage discrimination was found among last two groups, reaching between 10 and 25%. One can also observe the lack of country-specific skills and stronger motivation to work among immigrants from the bottom of wage distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Igor Jakubiak, 2015. "Immigrants in the United Kingdom: wage gap and origin," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 43.
  • Handle: RePEc:eko:ekoeko:43_67
    DOI: 10.17451/eko/43/2015/136
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Inese Šūpule, 2020. "Perceived Discrimination of Highly Educated Latvian Women Abroad," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, vol. 11(1), pages 1-19, December.

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