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The impact of HIV testing on subjective mortality and investments in children: Experimental evidence From Malawi

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  • Eriksson, Katherine
  • Sovero, Veronica

Abstract

We investigate the causal effect of HIV testing on subjective mortality and investment in children using experimental data from Malawi. When a wife’s husband learns his negative HIV status, we see an upward revision in a woman’s subjective mortality risk and less household investment in children. There is no statistically significant effect of the woman learning her HIV negative status.

Suggested Citation

  • Eriksson, Katherine & Sovero, Veronica, 2016. "The impact of HIV testing on subjective mortality and investments in children: Experimental evidence From Malawi," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 90-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:149:y:2016:i:c:p:90-93
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2016.10.017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:uwp:jhriss:v:52:y:2017:i:3:p:680-718 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Gil Shapira, 2017. "How Subjective Beliefs about HIV Infection Affect Life-Cycle Fertility: Evidence from Rural Malawi," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 52(3), pages 680-718.
    3. Ruben Castro & Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2015. "Perception of HIV risk and the quantity and quality of children: the case of rural Malawi," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 113-132, January.
    4. Dick Durevall & Annika Lindskog, 2011. "Uncovering the impact of the HIV epidemic on fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa: the case of Malawi," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 629-655, April.
    5. Joseph P. Romano & Michael Wolf, 2005. "Exact and Approximate Stepdown Methods for Multiple Hypothesis Testing," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 94-108, March.
    6. Adeline Delavande & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2012. "The Impact of HIV Testing on Subjective Expectations and Risky Behavior in Malawi," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 1011-1036, August.
    7. Rebecca L. Thornton, 2008. "The Demand for, and Impact of, Learning HIV Status," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1829-1863, December.
    8. Erick Gong, 2015. "HIV Testing and Risky Sexual Behaviour," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(582), pages 32-60, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    HIV; Malawi; Mortality; Fertility; Beliefs;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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