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Fiscal decentralization, fiscal rules and fiscal discipline

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  • Neyapti, Bilin

Abstract

Fiscal decentralization (FD) and fiscal rules (FR) are institutional mechanisms that are implemented by varying degrees in increasing number of countries. This paper investigates empirically the effect of FR on the effectiveness of FD in achieving fiscal discipline. Panel evidence strongly supports that balanced budget and expenditure rules help FD to achieve this goal, while debt rule has a direct disciplinary effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Neyapti, Bilin, 2013. "Fiscal decentralization, fiscal rules and fiscal discipline," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 528-532.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:121:y:2013:i:3:p:528-532
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.10.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Bartolini & Agnese Sacchi & Simone Salotti & Raffaella Santolini, 2015. "Fiscal decentralisation in times of financial crises," Working Papers. Collection A: Public economics, governance and decentralization 1506, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
    2. Aslim, Erkmen Giray & Neyapti, Bilin, 2017. "Optimal fiscal decentralization: Redistribution and welfare implications," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 224-234.
    3. Heinemann, Friedrich & Moessinger, Marc-Daniel & Yeter, Mustafa, 2015. "Do Fiscal Rules Constrain Fiscal Policy? A Meta-Regression-Analysis," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112800, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Neyapti, Bilin & Bulut-Cevik, Zeynep Burcu, 2014. "Fiscal efficiency, redistribution and welfare," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 375-382.
    5. Badinger, Harald & Reuter, Wolf Heinrich, 2017. "The case for fiscal rules," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 334-343.
    6. Santiago Lago-Peñas & Jorge Martínez-Vázquez & Agnese Sacchi, 2018. "Fiscal stability during the great recesion: Putting decentralization design to the test," Working Papers. Collection A: Public economics, governance and decentralization 1806, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
    7. repec:eee:poleco:v:51:y:2018:i:c:p:69-92 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:kap:pubcho:v:171:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0441-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:ekd:006356:6848 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal institutions; Fiscal decentralization; Fiscal rules; Budget deficits;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H72 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Budget and Expenditures
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy

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