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Hedonic methods for baskets of goods

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  • Griffith, Rachel
  • Nesheim, Lars

Abstract

Existing hedonic methods cannot be easily adapted to estimate willingness to pay for product characteristics when willingness to pay depends on a very large basket of goods. We show how to marry these methods with revealed preference arguments to estimate bounds on willingness to pay using data on purchases of seemingly impossibly high dimensional baskets of goods. This allows us to use observed purchase prices and quantities on a large basket of products to learn about individual household’s willingness to pay for characteristics, while maintaining a high degree of flexibility and also avoiding the biases that arise from inappropriate aggregation.

Suggested Citation

  • Griffith, Rachel & Nesheim, Lars, 2013. "Hedonic methods for baskets of goods," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 284-287.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:120:y:2013:i:2:p:284-287 DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.04.040
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laura Blow & Martin Browning & Ian Crawford, 2008. "Revealed Preference Analysis of Characteristics Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(2), pages 371-389.
    2. Rachel Griffith & Lars Nesheim, 2010. "Estimating households' willingness to pay," CeMMAP working papers CWP24/10, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Scotchmer, Suzanne, 1985. "Hedonic prices and cost/benefit analysis," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 55-75, October.
    4. Andrew Leicester & Zoë Oldfield, 2009. "Using Scanner Technology to Collect Expenditure Data," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 30(Special I), pages 309-337, December.
    5. Ariel Pakes, 2003. "A Reconsideration of Hedonic Price Indexes with an Application to PC's," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1578-1596, December.
    6. Kanemoto, Yoshitsugu, 1988. "Hedonic Prices and the Benefits of Public Projects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(4), pages 981-989, July.
    7. Rachel Griffith & Martin O'Connell, 2009. "The Use of Scanner Data for Research into Nutrition," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 30(Special I), pages 339-365, December.
    8. Pollak, Robert A., 1989. "The Theory of the Cost-of-Living Index," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195058703.
    9. C. Lanier Benkard & Patrick Bajari, 2005. "Hedonic Price Indexes With Unobserved Product Characteristics, and Application to Personal Computers," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 61-75, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hussein, Mohamud & Fraser, Iain & Costanigro, Marco, 2016. "Hedonic Analysis of Origin of Meat In The United Kingdom," 90th Annual Conference, April 4-6, 2016, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 236353, Agricultural Economics Society.
    2. Mika Kortelainen & Jibonayan Raychaudhuri & Beatrice Roussillon, 2016. "Effects Of Carbon Reduction Labels: Evidence From Scanner Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1167-1187, April.
    3. Ji Yan & Kun Tian & Huw D. Dixon & Saeed Heravi & Peter Morgan, 2014. "Shop Around and You Pay More," CESifo Working Paper Series 4940, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hedonic prices; Scanner data; Willingness to pay; Organic;

    JEL classification:

    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • L8 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services

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