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Communism or communists? Soviet legacies and corruption in transition economies

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  • Libman, Alexander
  • Obydenkova, Anastassia

Abstract

The paper investigates the influence of path dependence on corruption in Russian regions. We show that even twenty years after the collapse of the USSR, regions with a higher share of Communist Party members in the 1970s have substantially higher corruption.

Suggested Citation

  • Libman, Alexander & Obydenkova, Anastassia, 2013. "Communism or communists? Soviet legacies and corruption in transition economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 101-103.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:119:y:2013:i:1:p:101-103 DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.02.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. White, Stephen & Mcallister, Ian, 1996. "The CPSU and Its Members: Between Communism and Postcommunism," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(01), pages 105-122, January.
    2. Berkowitz, Daniel & DeJong, David N., 2011. "Growth in post-Soviet Russia: A tale of two transitions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 79(1-2), pages 133-143, June.
    3. Fuchs-Schundeln, Nicola & Alesina, Alberto, 2007. "Good-Bye Lenin (Or Not?): The Effect of Communism on People's Preferences," Scholarly Articles 4553032, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    4. Daniel Berkowitz & Mark Hoekstra & Koen Schoors, 2012. "Does Finance Cause Growth? Evidence from the Origins of Banking in Russia," NBER Working Papers 18139, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Popov, Vladimir, 2001. "Reform Strategies and Economic Performance of Russia's Regions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 865-886, May.
    6. Geishecker, Ingo & Haisken-DeNew, John P., 2004. "Landing on all fours? Communist elites in post-Soviet Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 700-719, December.
    7. Rainer, Helmut & Siedler, Thomas, 2009. "Does democracy foster trust?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 251-269, June.
    8. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Suzuki, Taku, 2012. "The determinants of corruption in transition economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(1), pages 54-60.
    9. Berkowitz, Daniel & Hoekstra, Mark & Schoors, Koen, 2014. "Bank privatization, finance, and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 93-106.
    10. Backhaus, Jürgen, 2008. "Gilt das Coase Theorem auch in den neuen Ländern?," Discourses in Social Market Economy 2008-04, OrdnungsPolitisches Portal (OPO).
    11. Shurchkov, Olga, 2012. "New elites and their influence on entrepreneurial activity in Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 240-255.
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    Cited by:

    1. Salahodjaev, Raufhon, 2017. "Government size, intelligence and life satisfaction," MPRA Paper 76902, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sauter, Nicolas, 2015. "Social networks as a catalyst of economic change," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 45-48.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; Transition economies; Path dependence; Soviet legacies;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • P26 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Political Economy

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