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Parental education, labor market experience and earnings: New wine in an old bottle?


  • Hudson, John
  • Sessions, John G.


Evidence from US data suggests that increases in parental education significantly steepen the slope of male experience–earnings profiles during early career years, other things equal.

Suggested Citation

  • Hudson, John & Sessions, John G., 2011. "Parental education, labor market experience and earnings: New wine in an old bottle?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 113(2), pages 112-115.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:113:y:2011:i:2:p:112-115 DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2011.05.053

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Murphy, Kevin M & Welch, Finis, 1990. "Empirical Age-Earnings Profiles," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(2), pages 202-229, April.
    2. Judith K. Hellerstein & David Neumark, 1995. "Are Earnings Profiles Steeper Than Productivity Profiles? Evidence from Israeli Firm-Level Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(1), pages 89-112.
    3. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Jagadeesh Gokhale, 1992. "Estimating a Firm's Age-Productivity Profile Using the Present Value of Workers' Earnings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1215-1242.
    4. Christian Dustmann, 2004. "Parental background, secondary school track choice, and wages," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 209-230, April.
    5. Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco, 2001. "Family Matters: Impacts of Family Background on Educational Attainments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(270), pages 137-156, May.
    6. Neumark, David, 1995. "Are Rising Earnings Profiles a Forced-Saving Mechanism?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(428), pages 95-106, January.
    7. Orley Ashenfelter & Cecilia Rouse, 1998. "Income, Schooling, and Ability: Evidence from a New Sample of Identical Twins," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(1), pages 253-284.
    8. Sarah Brown & John G. Sessions, 2006. "Some Evidence on the Relationship between Performance-Related Pay and the Shape of the Experience-Earnings Profile," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 660-676, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michele Raitano & Francesco Vona, 2015. "Measuring the link between intergenerational occupational mobility and earnings: evidence from eight European countries," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(1), pages 83-102, March.
    2. Michele Raitano & Claudia Vittori & Francesco Vona, 2016. "The effect of parental background along the sons’ earnings distribution: does one pattern fit for all?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(15), pages 1073-1078, October.
    3. Raitano Michele & Francesco Vona, 2015. "From the cradle to the grave : the effect of family background on the career path of italian men," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-05, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Michele Raitano & Francesco Vona, 2015. "Direct and Indirect Influences of Parental Background on Children's Earnings: a Comparison across Countries and Genders," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(4), pages 423-450, July.
    5. Maurizio Franzini & Mario Pianta, 2015. "Four engines of inequality," LEM Papers Series 2015/20, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

    More about this item


    Parental education; Human capital; Earnings;

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods


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