IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecolec/v69y2010i5p988-998.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Consistent and unbiased carbon dioxide emission multipliers: Performance of Danish emission reductions via external trade

Author

Listed:
  • Rueda-Cantuche, José M.
  • Amores, Antonio F.

Abstract

Climate change research is currently a topic of great interest for economic researchers. In particular, environmental input-output analysis increasingly plays an important role in measuring the economic and environmental effects of sustainable development policies in Europe. Other approaches also exist, such as econometric modelling, in which impacts are quantified on statistical grounds and with certain desirable properties (efficient estimates, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, etc.) that are not found in the input-output approach. Consequently, this paper merges the two approaches to address the calculation of unbiased and consistent carbon dioxide emission multipliers for Denmark and their respective confidence intervals. The use of the supply and use system instead of the symmetric input-output table also presents the opportunity to avoid the common problems associated with the construction of technical coefficients (technology assumptions, negatives, etc.). Moreover, a new policy-relevant application of these multipliers is introduced: the quantification of the performance of the carbon dioxide emission reductions carried out by industries via external trading.

Suggested Citation

  • Rueda-Cantuche, José M. & Amores, Antonio F., 2010. "Consistent and unbiased carbon dioxide emission multipliers: Performance of Danish emission reductions via external trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 988-998, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:5:p:988-998
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921-8009(10)00028-5
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roland-Holst, David W, 1989. "Bias and Stability of Multiplier Estimates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(4), pages 718-721, November.
    2. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    3. Lenzen, Manfred, 1998. "Primary energy and greenhouse gases embodied in Australian final consumption: an input-output analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 495-506, May.
    4. Dietzenbacher, Erik, 1988. "Estimation of the Leontief inverse from the practitioner's point of view," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 181-187, October.
    5. Llop, Maria, 2007. "Economic structure and pollution intensity within the environmental input-output framework," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 3410-3417, June.
    6. Erik Dietzenbacher, 2006. "Multiplier Estimates: To Bias Or Not To Bias?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 773-786, October.
    7. Morilla, Carmen Rodriguez & Diaz-Salazar, Gaspar Llanes & Cardenete, M. Alejandro, 2007. "Economic and environmental efficiency using a social accounting matrix," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 774-786, February.
    8. Thijs ten Raa & José Manuel Rueda-Cantuche, 2009. "The Construction of Input–Output Coefficients Matrices in an Axiomatic Context: Some Further Considerations," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Input–Output Economics: Theory And Applications Featuring Asian Economies, chapter 6, pages 77-101, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    9. Erik Dietzenbacher & Kakali Mukhopadhyay, 2007. "An Empirical Examination of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis for India: Towards a Green Leontief Paradox?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 36(4), pages 427-449, April.
    10. Mette Wier, 1998. "Sources of Changes in Emissions from Energy: A Structural Decomposition Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 99-112.
    11. de Haan, Mark & Keuning, Steven J, 1996. "Taking the Environment into Account: The NAMEA Approach," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 42(2), pages 131-148, June.
    12. Faye Duchin, 2005. "A world trade model based on comparative advantage with m regions, n goods, and k factors," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 141-162.
    13. José M. Rueda-Cantuche & Thijs ten Raa, 2021. "The Choice of Model in the Construction of Industry Coefficients Matrices," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Efficiency and Input-Output Analyses Theory and Applications, chapter 16, pages 271-287, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    14. FlAm, Sjur D. & Thorlund-Petersen, Lars, 1985. "Underestimation in the Leontief model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(2-3), pages 171-174.
    15. Lahiri, Sajal, 1983. "A note on the underestimation and overestimation in stochastic input-output models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 361-366.
    16. Zhongxiang Zhang, 1998. "Macro-economic and Sectoral Effects of Carbon Taxes: A General Equilibrium Analysis for China," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 135-159.
    17. Simonovits, A, 1975. "A Note on the Underestimation and Overestimation of the Leontief Inverse," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 43(3), pages 493-498, May.
    18. Leontief, Wassily, 1970. "Environmental Repercussions and the Economic Structure: An Input-Output Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(3), pages 262-271, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Matías Piaggio & Vicent Alcántara Escolano & Emilio Padilla, 2012. "Economic structure and key sectors analysis of greenhouse gas emissions in Uruguay," Working Papers wpdea1204, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    2. Anderson, Blake & M'Gonigle, Michael, 2012. "Does ecological economics have a future?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 37-48.
    3. Arndt, Channing & Makrelov, Konstantin & Thurlow, James, 2011. "Measuring the Carbon Content of the South African Economy," WIDER Working Paper Series 045, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Tsagkari Marula & Gaona Alexis & Gonzalez Juan-Felipe & Järvinen Jaakko, 2018. "The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Poland: An input-output approach," Environmental & Socio-economic Studies, Sciendo, vol. 6(3), pages 36-43, September.
    5. Umed Temurshoev, 2015. "Uncertainty treatment in input-output analysis," Working Papers 2015-004, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, Department of Economics.
    6. Rodrigues, João F.D. & Rueda-Cantuche, José M., 2013. "A two-stage econometric method for the estimation of carbon multipliers with rectangular supply and use tables," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 206-212.
    7. Channing Arndt & Rob Davies & Konstantin Makrelov & James Thurlow, 2011. "Measuring the Carbon Content of the South African Economy," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2011-045, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Manfred Lenzen, 2001. "A Generalized Input-Output Multiplier Calculus for Australia," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 65-92.
    2. Tarancon, Miguel Angel & Del Río, Pablo, 2012. "Assessing energy-related CO2 emissions with sensitivity analysis and input-output techniques," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 161-170.
    3. Umed Temurshoev, 2015. "Uncertainty treatment in input-output analysis," Working Papers 2015-004, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, Department of Economics.
    4. Marin, Giovanni & Mazzanti, Massimiliano, 2009. "Emissions Trends, Labour Productivity Dynamics and Time-Related Events - Sector Heterogeneous Analyses of Decoupling/Recoupling on a 1990-2006 NAMEA," MPRA Paper 20087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Maria Llop & Richard S.J. Tol, 2013. "Decomposition of sectoral greenhouse gas emissions: a subsystem input-output model for the Republic of Ireland," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(9), pages 1316-1331, November.
    6. Giovanni Marin & Massimiliano Mazzanti, 2013. "The evolution of environmental and labor productivity dynamics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 357-399, April.
    7. Tarancón, Miguel Angel & del Río, Pablo & Callejas Albiñana, Fernando, 2010. "Assessing the influence of manufacturing sectors on electricity demand. A cross-country input-output approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1900-1908, April.
    8. Darian McBain & Ali Alsamawi, 2014. "Quantitative accounting for social economic indicators," Natural Resources Forum, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(3), pages 193-202, August.
    9. Liu, Hongtao & Xi, Youmin & Guo, Ju'e & Li, Xia, 2010. "Energy embodied in the international trade of China: An energy input-output analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 3957-3964, August.
    10. Cámara Sánchez , Ángeles & Flores García, Mónica & Fuentes Saguar, Patricia D., 2013. "Análisis de las emisiones asociadas al sector energético en España /Emissions Associated with the Energy Sector in Spain Using a Social Accounting Matrix and Environmental Accounts," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 151-170, Enero.
    11. Tarancón Morán, Miguel Ángel & del Ri­o, Pablo & Albiñana, Fernando Callejas, 2008. "Tracking the genealogy of CO2 emissions in the electricity sector: An intersectoral approach applied to the Spanish case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1915-1926, June.
    12. Butnar, Isabela & Llop Llop, Maria, 2010. "Structural decomposition analysis and input-output subsystems: An application to Spanish CO2 emissions," Working Papers 2072/151546, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    13. Cansino, J.M. & Cardenete, M.A. & Ordóñez, M. & Román, R., 2012. "Economic analysis of greenhouse gas emissions in the Spanish economy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(8), pages 6032-6039.
    14. Duarte, Rosa & Mainar, Alfredo & Sánchez-Chóliz, Julio, 2010. "The impact of household consumption patterns on emissions in Spain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 176-185, January.
    15. Li, Xi & Zhang, Runsen & Chen, Jundong & Jiang, Yida & Zhang, Qiong & Long, Yin, 2021. "Urban-scale carbon footprint evaluation based on citizen travel demand in Japan," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 286(C).
    16. Kumar, Indraneel & Tyner, Wallace E. & Sinha, Kumares C., 2016. "Input–output life cycle environmental assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from utility scale wind energy in the United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 294-301.
    17. Wiedmann, Thomas, 2009. "A review of recent multi-region input-output models used for consumption-based emission and resource accounting," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 211-222, December.
    18. Llop, Maria, 2017. "Changes in energy output in a regional economy: A structural decomposition analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 145-151.
    19. Laia Pié, 2017. "The Catalan Economy towards the New European Energy Policy: Through Accounting of Greenhouse Emission Multipliers," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(12), pages 1-18, December.
    20. Kratena, Kurt, 2008. "From ecological footprint to ecological rent: An economic indicator for resource constraints," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 507-516, January.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:5:p:988-998. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.