IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

How does Japanese compliance with the Kyoto Protocol affect environmental productivity in China and Japan?

  • Kagawa, Shigemi
Registered author(s):

    The present paper empirically investigates whether competitive pressures and Japanese compliance with the Kyoto Protocol will turn China into a pollution haven. We also analyze how the bilateral division of commodity production stimulates eco-efficiencies (i.e. environmental productivities) in Japan and China and how eco-efficiencies in the respective countries affect each other. Empirical results revealed that competitive pressure and Japanese compliance with the Kyoto Protocol did not contribute to turning China into a pollution haven. We also find that if we focus on national eco-efficiencies, China and Japan are unable to develop a mutually beneficial relationship between the eco-efficiencies in both countries.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Structural Change and Economic Dynamics.

    Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 173-188

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:19:y:2008:i:2:p:173-188
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Mette Wier & Line Block Christoffersen & Trine Jensen & Ole Pedersen & Hans Keiding & Jesper Munksgaard, 2005. "Evaluating sustainability of household consumption—Using DEA to assess environmental performance," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 425-447.
    2. Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 2001. "An Account of Global Factor Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1423-1453, December.
    3. Thijs Ten Raa & Pierre Mohnen, 2001. "The Location of Comparative Advantages on the Basis of Fundamentals Only," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 93-108.
    4. Thijs Raa & Pierre Mohnen, 2002. "Neoclassical Growth Accounting and Frontier Analysis: A Synthesis," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 111-128, September.
    5. Fare, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Tyteca, Daniel, 1996. "An activity analysis model of the environmental performance of firms--application to fossil-fuel-fired electric utilities," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 161-175, August.
    6. Davis, Donald R. & David E. Weinstein & Scott C. Bradford & Kazushige Shimpo, 1997. "Using International and Japanese Regional Data to Determine When the Factor Abundance Theory of Trade Works," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 421-46, June.
    7. Fare, Rolf, et al, 1989. "Multilateral Productivity Comparisons When Some Outputs Are Undesirable: A Nonparametric Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(1), pages 90-98, February.
    8. Harry P. Bowen & Edward E. Leamer & Leo Sveikauskas, 1986. "Multicountry, Multifactor Tests of the Factor Abundance Theory," NBER Working Papers 1918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Gregory C. Chow, 1993. "Capital Formation and Economic Growth in China," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 809-842.
    10. Faye Duchin, 2003. "A World Trade Model Based on Comparative Advantage with m Regions, n Goods, and k Factors," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0309, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2004.
    11. Hakura, Dalia S., 2001. "Why does HOV fail?: The role of technological differences within the EC," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 361-382, August.
    12. Trefler, Daniel, 1995. "The Case of the Missing Trade and Other Mysteries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1029-46, December.
    13. Baldwin, Robert E, 1971. "Determinants of the Commodity Structure of U.S. Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(1), pages 126-46, March.
    14. Leamer, Edward E, 1980. "The Leontief Paradox, Reconsidered," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(3), pages 495-503, June.
    15. Trefler, Daniel, 1993. "International Factor Price Differences: Leontief Was Right!," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(6), pages 961-87, December.
    16. Erik Dietzenbacher & Kakali Mukhopadhyay, 2007. "An Empirical Examination of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis for India: Towards a Green Leontief Paradox?," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 36(4), pages 427-449, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:19:y:2008:i:2:p:173-188. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.