IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecoedu/v24y2005i4p417-430.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The short term effect of educational debt on job decisions

Author

Listed:
  • Minicozzi, Alexandra

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Minicozzi, Alexandra, 2005. "The short term effect of educational debt on job decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 417-430, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:24:y:2005:i:4:p:417-430
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272-7757(04)00117-7
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kermit Daniel & Dan Black & Jeffery Smith, 1996. "College Quality and the Wages of Young Men," HEW 9604001, EconWPA.
    2. Stacy Berg Dale & Alan B. Krueger, 2002. "Estimating the Payoff to Attending a More Selective College: An Application of Selection on Observables and Unobservables," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1491-1527.
    3. Flyer, Fredrick A, 1997. "The Influence of Higher Moments of Earnings Distributions on Career Decisions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(4), pages 689-713, October.
    4. Shaw, Kathryn L, 1996. "An Empirical Analysis of Risk Aversion and Income Growth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 626-653, October.
    5. Orazem, Peter F & Mattila, J Peter, 1991. "Human Capital, Uncertain Wage Distributions, and Occupational and Educational Choices," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(1), pages 103-122, February.
    6. Loprest, Pamela J, 1992. "Gender Differences in Wage Growth and Job Mobility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 526-532, May.
    7. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 2001. "The Effect of Parental Transfers and Borrowing Constraints on Educational Attainment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1051-1103, November.
    8. Dominic J. Brewer & Eric R. Eide & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1999. "Does It Pay to Attend an Elite Private College? Cross-Cohort Evidence on the Effects of College Type on Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 104-123.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0643-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Fenaba Addo, 2014. "Debt, Cohabitation, and Marriage in Young Adulthood," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1677-1701, October.
    3. William Elliott & Melinda Lewis, 2015. "Student Debt Effects On Financial Well-Being: Research And Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 614-636, September.
    4. Zhan, Min & Xiang, Xiaoling & Elliott, William, 2016. "Education loans and wealth building among young adults," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 67-75.
    5. Rothstein, Jesse & Rouse, Cecilia Elena, 2011. "Constrained after college: Student loans and early-career occupational choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1-2), pages 149-163, February.
    6. Gicheva, Dora, 2011. "Does the Student-Loan Burden Weigh into the Decision to Start a Family?," UNCG Economics Working Papers 11-14, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    7. Kaas, Leo & Zink, Stefan, 2011. "Human capital investment with competitive labor search," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 520-534, May.
    8. Elliott, William & Nam, IlSung, 2013. "Is student debt jeopardizing the short-term financial health of U.S. households?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 405-424.
    9. Tatiana Velasco Rodriguez & Fabio Sánchez Torres, 2014. "¿Los préstamos para educación superior mejoran el salario? Crédito Educativo y Mercado Laboral: una aproximación de regresión discontinua para Colombia," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 40, pages 769-795 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    10. Gicheva, Dora, 2016. "Student loans or marriage? A look at the highly educated," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 207-216.
    11. Aurora Ortiz-Nuñez, 2014. "Attitudes Toward Risk And Socioeconomic Factors Related To Educational Loans," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 710-718, October.
    12. Nicolas Ziebarth & Martin Gervais, 2017. "Life after Debt: Post-Graduation Consequences of Federal Student Loans," 2017 Meeting Papers 238, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    13. Fabio Sánchez & Tatiana Velasco, 2014. "Do Loans for Higher Education Lead to Better Salaries? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Approach for Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 012229, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    14. Ali Ait Si Mhamed & Rita Kaša & Zane Cunska, 2012. "Student debt levels and income of University of Latvia graduates: Prospects for income-contingent loan repayment by the field of studies and gender," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 12(2), pages 73-88, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:24:y:2005:i:4:p:417-430. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.