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Alexandra Minicozzi

Personal Details

First Name:Alexandra
Middle Name:
Last Name:Minicozzi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmi237
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:1997 Economics Department; University of Wisconsin-Madison (from RePEc Genealogy)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. David Auerbach & Janet Holtzblatt & Paul Jacobs & Alexandra Minicozzi & Pamela Moomau & Chapin White, 2010. "Will Health Insurance Mandates Increase Coverage? Synthesizing Perspectives from Health, Tax, and Behavioral Economics: Working Paper 2010-05," Working Papers 21600, Congressional Budget Office.

Articles

  1. Auerbach, David & Holtzblatt, Janet & Jacobs, Paul & Minicozzi, Alexandra & Moomau, Pamela & White, Chapin, 2010. "Will Health Insurance Mandates Increase Coverage?Synthesizing Perspectives From Health, Tax, Andbehavioral Economics," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 63(4), pages 659-679, December.
  2. Minicozzi, Alexandra, 2005. "The short term effect of educational debt on job decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 417-430, August.
  3. Alexandra L. Minicozzi, 2003. "Estimation of sons' intergenerational earnings mobility in the presence of censoring," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 291-314.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. David Auerbach & Janet Holtzblatt & Paul Jacobs & Alexandra Minicozzi & Pamela Moomau & Chapin White, 2010. "Will Health Insurance Mandates Increase Coverage? Synthesizing Perspectives from Health, Tax, and Behavioral Economics: Working Paper 2010-05," Working Papers 21600, Congressional Budget Office.

    Cited by:

    1. Ericson, Keith Marzilli & Kessler, Judd B., 2016. "The articulation of government policy: Health insurance mandates versus taxes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 43-54.

Articles

  1. Auerbach, David & Holtzblatt, Janet & Jacobs, Paul & Minicozzi, Alexandra & Moomau, Pamela & White, Chapin, 2010. "Will Health Insurance Mandates Increase Coverage?Synthesizing Perspectives From Health, Tax, Andbehavioral Economics," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 63(4), pages 659-679, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan T. Kolstad & Amanda E. Kowalski, 2012. "Mandate-Based Health Reform and the Labor Market: Evidence from the Massachusetts Reform," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1855, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.

  2. Minicozzi, Alexandra, 2005. "The short term effect of educational debt on job decisions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 417-430, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Fenaba Addo, 2014. "Debt, Cohabitation, and Marriage in Young Adulthood," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1677-1701, October.
    2. Nicolas Ziebarth & Martin Gervais, 2017. "Life after Debt: Post-Graduation Consequences of Federal Student Loans," 2017 Meeting Papers 238, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Jesse Rothstein & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 2007. "Constrained After College: Student Loans and Early Career Occupational Choices," Working Papers 18, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Education Research Section..
    4. Zhan, Min & Xiang, Xiaoling & Elliott, William, 2016. "Education loans and wealth building among young adults," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 67-75.
    5. Elliott, William & Nam, IlSung, 2013. "Is student debt jeopardizing the short-term financial health of U.S. households?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 405-424.
    6. Gicheva, Dora, 2016. "Student loans or marriage? A look at the highly educated," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 207-216.
    7. Kaas, Leo & Zink, Stefan, 2011. "Human capital investment with competitive labor search," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 520-534, May.
    8. Gicheva, Dora, 2011. "Does the Student-Loan Burden Weigh into the Decision to Start a Family?," UNCG Economics Working Papers 11-14, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    9. Aurora Ortiz-Nuñez, 2014. "Attitudes Toward Risk And Socioeconomic Factors Related To Educational Loans," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 710-718, October.
    10. Ali Ait Si Mhamed & Rita Kaša & Zane Cunska, 2012. "Student debt levels and income of University of Latvia graduates: Prospects for income-contingent loan repayment by the field of studies and gender," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 12(2), pages 73-88, December.
    11. William Elliott & Melinda Lewis, 2015. "Student Debt Effects On Financial Well-Being: Research And Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(4), pages 614-636, September.
    12. Fabio Sánchez & Tatiana Velasco, 2014. "Do Loans for Higher Education Lead to Better Salaries? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Approach for Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 012229, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    13. Tatiana Velasco Rodriguez & Fabio Sánchez Torres, 2014. "¿Los préstamos para educación superior mejoran el salario? Crédito Educativo y Mercado Laboral: una aproximación de regresión discontinua para Colombia," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 40, pages 769-795 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.

  3. Alexandra L. Minicozzi, 2003. "Estimation of sons' intergenerational earnings mobility in the presence of censoring," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 291-314.

    Cited by:

    1. Sokbae Lee & Oliver Linton & Yoon-Jae Whang, 2009. "Testing for Stochastic Monotonicity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(2), pages 585-602, March.
    2. Ueda Atsuko, 2009. "Intergenerational Mobility of Earnings and Income in Japan," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-27, December.
    3. Markus Jantti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2014. "Income Mobility," Working Papers 319, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    4. Berghaus, Betina & Bücher, Axel, 2014. "Nonparametric tests for tail monotonicity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 180(2), pages 117-126.
    5. María Cervini Plá, 2009. "Measuring intergenerational earnings mobility in Spain: A selection-bias-free," Working Papers wpdea0904, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    6. Maribel Jiménez, 2011. "Un Análisis Empírico de las No Linealidades en la Movilidad Intergeneracional del Ingreso. El caso de la Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0114, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    7. Francesconi, Marco & Nicoletti, Cheti, 2004. "Intergenerational mobility and sample selection in short panels," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-17, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Nicoletti, Cheti, 2008. "Multiple sample selection in the estimation of intergenerational occupational mobility," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-20, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Chris Belfield & Claire Crawford & Ellen Greaves & Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2017. "Intergenerational income persistence within families," IFS Working Papers W17/11, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    10. Donal O’Neill & Olive Sweetman & Dirk Van de gaer, 2007. "The effects of measurement error and omitted variables when using transition matrices to measure intergenerational mobility," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 5(2), pages 159-178, August.
    11. Cardak, Buly A. & Johnston, David W. & Martin, Vance L., 2013. "Intergenerational earnings mobility: A new decomposition of investment and endowment effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 39-47.
    12. Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco & Siedler, Thomas, 2005. "Intergenerational Economic Mobility and Assortative Mating," IZA Discussion Papers 1847, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Thorsten Vogel, 2006. "Reassessing Intergenerational Mobility in Germany and the United States: The Impact of Differences in Lifecycle Earnings Patterns," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2006-055, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    14. Steven N. Durlauf & Andros Kourtellos & Chih Ming Tan, 2016. "Status Traps," Working Paper series 16-13, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.

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