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Intergenerational Mobility of Earnings and Income in Japan

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  • Ueda Atsuko

    () (Waseda University)

Abstract

This paper presents estimates on the intergenerational mobility of economic status in Japan. We estimate the intergenerational elasticity of the earnings and income of offspring with respect to parental income using microdata from the 19932004 rounds of the Japanese Panel Survey of Consumers. The estimated intergenerational elasticity using predicted parental income is 0.410.46 for married sons, 0.300.38 for married daughters, and marginally less than 0.30 for single daughters. A downward trend in elasticity is also observed. Quantile regression does not suggest any particular relation between elasticity and quantiles. A nonlinear analysis of the relation between parental log income and log earnings of offspring illustrates an S-shaped relation for married sons and single daughters, and a linear relation for married daughters.

Suggested Citation

  • Ueda Atsuko, 2009. "Intergenerational Mobility of Earnings and Income in Japan," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-27, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:9:y:2009:i:1:n:54
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Quheng Deng & Björn Gustafsson & Shi Li, 2013. "Intergenerational Income Persistence in Urban China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(3), pages 416-436, September.
    2. Chu, Luke Yu-Wei & Lin, Ming-Jen, 2016. "Economic development and intergenerational earnings mobility: Evidence from Taiwan," Working Paper Series 5272, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Kawaguchi, Daiji, 2016. "Fewer school days, more inequality," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 35-52.
    4. Doan, Quang Hung & Nguyen, Ngoc Anh, 2016. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 70603, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. John Jerrim & Alvaro Choi & Rosa Simancas Rodriguez, 2014. "Two-Sample Two-Stage Least Squares (TSTSLS) estimates of earnings mobility: how consistent are they?," DoQSS Working Papers 14-17, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    6. Arnaud Lefranc & Fumiaki Ojima & Takashi Yoshida, 2014. "Intergenerational earnings mobility in Japan among sons and daughters: levels and trends," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 91-134, January.
    7. Leone, Tharcisio, 2019. "The geography of intergenerational mobility: Evidence of educational persistence and the "Great Gatsby Curve" in Brazil," GIGA Working Papers 318, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    8. repec:bla:jecrev:v:68:y:2017:i:4:p:470-496 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Fengye Sun & Atsuko Ueda, 2015. "Intergenerational earnings mobility in Taiwan," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 187-197.

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