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What Do Educational Credentials Signal and Why Do Employers Value Credentials?

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  • Arkes, Jeremy

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  • Arkes, Jeremy, 1999. "What Do Educational Credentials Signal and Why Do Employers Value Credentials?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 133-141, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:18:y:1999:i:1:p:133-141
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    1. Kane, Thomas J & Rouse, Cecilia Elena, 1995. "Labor-Market Returns to Two- and Four-Year College," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 600-614, June.
    2. Heywood, John S., 1994. "How widespread are sheepskin returns to education in the U.S.?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 227-234, September.
    3. Belman, Dale & Heywood, John S, 1991. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education: An Examination on Women and Minorities," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 720-724, November.
    4. Hungerford, Thomas & Solon, Gary, 1987. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 175-177, February.
    5. Bishop, John, 1992. "The impact of academic competencies on wages, unemployment, and job performance," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 127-194, December.
    6. W. Norton Grubb, 1993. "The Varied Economic Returns to Postsecondary Education: New Evidence from the Class of 1972," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(2), pages 365-382.
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    Cited by:

    1. Koedel, Cory & Tyhurst, Eric, 2012. "Math skills and labor-market outcomes: Evidence from a resume-based field experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 131-140.
    2. Henry Renski, 2018. "Estimating the Returns to Professional Certifications and Licenses in the U.S. Manufacturing Sector," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 32(4), pages 341-356, November.
    3. Fabrizio Zerbini, 2017. "CSR Initiatives as Market Signals: A Review and Research Agenda," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 146(1), pages 1-23, November.
    4. Jean-Louis ARCAND & Béatrice D'HOMBRES & Cl. PONDE AVENA, 2002. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education by Ethnic Group: Evidence from Northeastern Brazil," Working Papers 200226, CERDI.
    5. Hunt, Karin & Rankin, Neil A. & Schöer, Volker & Nthuli, Miracle & Sebastiao, Claire, 2009. "Blind Admission? The ability of NSC maths to signal competence in university commerce courses as compared to the former SC Higher Grade maths," MPRA Paper 18075, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. C Dougherty, 2000. "Numeracy, Literacy and Earnings: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," CEP Discussion Papers dp0478, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Tracy L. Regan & Ronald L. Oaxaca & Galen Burghardt, 2007. "A Human Capital Model Of The Effects Of Ability And Family Background On Optimal Schooling Levels," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 721-738, October.
    8. Jhon James Mora, 2003. "Sheepskin effects and screening in Colombia," Colombian Economic Journal, Universidad Nacional de Colombia -FCE - CID, April.
      • Jhon James Mora, 2003. "Sheepskin effects and screening in Colombia," Colombian Economic Journal, Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Economicas, Colegio Mayor de Nuestra Senora del Rosario, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Universidad de Antioquia, Universidad de los Andes, Universidad del Valle, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, vol. 1(1), pages 95-108, December.
    9. Kun Andras Istvan, 2014. "The Sheepskin Effect In The Hungarian Labour Market 2010-2012: Analysis Of Data From The Hungarian Graduate Tracking System," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 492-499, July.
    10. Christer Thrane, 2010. "Education and Earnings in the Tourism Industry – the Role of Sheepskin Effects," Tourism Economics, , vol. 16(3), pages 549-563, September.
    11. Ithai Stern & Sharon D. James, 2016. "Whom are you promoting? Positive voluntary public disclosures and executive turnover," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(7), pages 1413-1430, July.
    12. Nicolas Hérault & Rezida Zakirova, 2011. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education: Accounting for Enrolment and Completion Effects," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2011n04, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    13. Alfonso Flores-Lagunes & Audrey Light, 2010. "Interpreting Degree Effects in the Returns to Education," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
    14. Alfonso Flores-Lagunes & Audrey Light, "undated". "Interpreting Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," Working Papers 22, Princeton University, School of Public and International Affairs, Education Research Section..
    15. Empar Pons & Juan Blanco, 2005. "Sheepskin Effects in the Spanish Labour Market: A Public-Private Sector Analysis," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 331-347.
    16. Dougherty, Christopher, 2003. "Numeracy, literacy and earnings: evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 511-521, October.
    17. Nicolas H�rault & Rezida Zakirova, 2015. "Returns to education: accounting for enrolment and completion effects," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 84-100, February.
    18. Antelius, Jesper, 2000. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education: Evidence on Swedish Data," Working Paper Series 158, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    19. Regan, Tracy L. & Burghardt, Galen & Oaxaca, Ronald L., 2006. "A Human Capital Model of the Effects of Abilities and Family Background on Optimal Schooling Levels," IZA Discussion Papers 1927, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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