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The relationship between agricultural technologies and carbon emissions in Pakistan: Peril and promise

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  • Zaman, Khalid
  • Khan, Muhammad Mushtaq
  • Ahmad, Mehboob
  • Khilji, Bashir Ahmad

Abstract

The objective of the study is to investigate the influence of agricultural technologies on carbon emissions in Pakistan by using annual data from 1975 to 2010. Data is analyzed by some econometrics techniques including cointegration theory, Granger causality test, variance decomposition, etc. The results reveal that agricultural technologies act as an important driver for increase in carbon emissions in Pakistan. Results indicate that unidirectional causality runs from agriculture machinery to carbon emissions but not vice versa. Agricultural technologies are closely associated with economic growth and carbon emissions in Pakistan. Variance decomposition analysis shows that among all the agricultural technologies, granting subsidies to the agriculture sector have exerts the largest contribution to changes in carbon emissions. Conversely, agricultural irrigated land seems relatively the least contributors on changes in carbon emissions due to infertility of total irrigated land available in Pakistan.

Suggested Citation

  • Zaman, Khalid & Khan, Muhammad Mushtaq & Ahmad, Mehboob & Khilji, Bashir Ahmad, 2012. "The relationship between agricultural technologies and carbon emissions in Pakistan: Peril and promise," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 1632-1639.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:29:y:2012:i:5:p:1632-1639
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2012.05.024
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    Cited by:

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    2. Mumtaz, Rehma & Zaman, Khalid & Sajjad, Faiza & Lodhi, Muhammad Saeed & Irfan, Muhammad & Khan, Imran & Naseem, Imran, 2014. "Modeling the causal relationship between energy and growth factors: Journey towards sustainable development," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 353-365.
    3. Chuanhe Xiong & Degang Yang & Jinwei Huo, 2016. "Spatial-Temporal Characteristics and LMDI-Based Impact Factor Decomposition of Agricultural Carbon Emissions in Hotan Prefecture, China," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 8(3), pages 1-14, March.
    4. Chuanhe Xiong & Shuang Chen & Liting Xu, 2020. "Driving factors analysis of agricultural carbon emissions based on extended STIRPAT model of Jiangsu Province, China," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 1401-1416, September.
    5. Khan, Muhammad Azhar & Khan, Muhammad Zahir & Zaman, Khalid & Khan, Muhammad Mushtaq & Zahoor, Hina, 2013. "RETRACTED: Causal links between greenhouse gas emissions, economic growth and energy consumption in Pakistan: A fatal disorder of society," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 166-176.
    6. Debashis Chakraborty & Sacchidananda Mukherjee, 2013. "Do Foreign Trade and Investment Lead to Higher CO2 Emissions? Evidence from Cross-Country Empirical Estimates," Review of Market Integration, India Development Foundation, vol. 5(3), pages 329-361, December.
    7. Dogan, Eyup & Sebri, Maamar & Turkekul, Berna, 2016. "Exploring the relationship between agricultural electricity consumption and output: New evidence from Turkish regional data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 370-377.
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    9. Anam Azam & Muhammad Rafiq & Muhammad Shafique & Muhammad Ateeq & Jiahai Yuan, 2020. "Causality Relationship Between Electricity Supply and Economic Growth: Evidence from Pakistan," Energies, MDPI, vol. 13(4), pages 1-20, February.
    10. Espinosa-Tasón, Jaime & Berbel, Julio & Gutiérrez-Martín, Carlos, 2020. "Energized water: Evolution of water-energy nexus in the Spanish irrigated agriculture, 1950–2017," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 233(C).

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    Keywords

    Agricultural technologies; Carbon emissions; Economic growth; Tractors; Pakistan;
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