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The demand for sleep: A South African study

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  • Szalontai, Gabor

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  • Szalontai, Gabor, 2006. "The demand for sleep: A South African study," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 854-874, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:23:y:2006:i:5:p:854-874
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Wittenberg, 2005. "The school day in South Africa," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 113, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Darren Lubotsky & Martin Wittenberg, 2006. "Interpretation of Regressions with Multiple Proxies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 549-562, August.
    3. Biddle, Jeff E & Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1990. "Sleep and the Allocation of Time," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 922-943, October.
    4. Michael, Robert T, 1973. "Education in Nonmarket Production," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 306-327, Part I, M.
    5. Newey, Whitney K & Powell, James L & Walker, James R, 1990. "Semiparametric Estimation of Selection Models: Some Empirical Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 324-328, May.
    6. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-318, May.
    7. James J. Heckman & Thomas E. Macurdy, 1980. "A Life Cycle Model of Female Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 47-74.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wittenberg, Martin, 2007. "Testing for a common latent variable in a linear regression," MPRA Paper 2550, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Gibson, Matthew & Shrader, Jeffrey, 2014. "Time Use and Productivity: The Wage Returns to Sleep," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8zp518hc, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    3. Christian Pfeifer, 2015. "Unfair Wage Perceptions and Sleep: Evidence from German Survey Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 789, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Pierre Brochu & Catherine Armstrong & Louis-Philippe Morin, 2012. "The ‘trendiness’ of sleep: an empirical investigation into the cyclical nature of sleep time," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 891-913, October.
    5. Juan Carlos Trujillo Lora & Wilman Iglesias Pinedo, 2015. "Sueño y asignación de tiempo entre los estudiantes universitarios: el caso de la Universidad del Atlántico," REVISTA SEMESTRE ECONÓMICO, UNIVERSIDAD DE MEDELLÍN, vol. 13(27), pages 99-116, September.
    6. Joan Costa-Font & Sarah Flèche, 2017. "Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study," CEP Discussion Papers dp1467, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Alan T. Piper, 2016. "Sleep duration and life satisfaction," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 63(4), pages 305-325, December.
    8. Tinna Laufey Ásgeirsdóttir & Sigurður Páll Ólafsson & Gylfi Zoega, 2016. "Sleep and the management of alertness," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 15(2), pages 169-189, November.
    9. Sedigh, Golnaz & Devlin, Rose Anne & Grenier, Gilles & Deri Armstrong, Catherine, 2017. "Revisiting the relationship between wages and sleep duration: The role of insomnia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 125-139.
    10. repec:bpj:bejeap:v:17:y:2017:i:2:p:37:n:5 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2016. "If You Don't Snooze You Lose: Evidence on Health and Weight," IZA Discussion Papers 9773, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Jara-Díaz, Sergio & Rosales-Salas, Jorge, 2017. "Beyond transport time: A review of time use modeling," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 209-230.
    13. Bishop, James, 2015. "No Rest for the Weary: Commuting, Hours Worked, and Sleep," MPRA Paper 62162, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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