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On firm-level, industry-level, and aggregate employment fluctuations

  • Casares, Miguel

Employment fluctuations are examined, at different levels of aggregation, in a model with firm-specific hiring decisions due to search frictions and sticky pricing. The results indicate that firm-level employment dispersion rises with higher price stickiness and higher demand elasticity, whereas it falls with more convexity of search costs and with a higher labor supply elasticity. Industry-level employment is more volatile and less procyclical than aggregate employment, and a larger industry size reduces volatility and raises co-movement with output. The calibrated model is able to match the volatility, autocorrelation and cyclical correlation of US industry-level employment when incorporating firm-specific technology shocks.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 37 (2013)
Issue (Month): 12 ()
Pages: 2963-2978

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:37:y:2013:i:12:p:2963-2978
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jedc

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