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Early childhood care and education attendance in Central Asia

  • Habibov, Nazim
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    Drawing on a set of recent nationally-representative surveys, this study examines Early Childhood Care and Education attendance in Central Asia. Between 12% and 22% of children attended ECCE, while the number of attendance hours was irregular and varied greatly. Having a mother with lower education and being from a poorer household reduced the likelihood of attendance in all countries. Living in a rural area reduced the likelihood of attendance in all countries except Kazakhstan. Other factors associated with lower likelihood of attendance varied across countries and included having an additional child under 5 in the household, an increase in child age, and residing in a non-Russian speaking household. In terms of frequency of attendance, living in capital cities was associated with an increase in attendance frequency in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, while residing in a wealthier household was associated with an increase in frequency in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. Measures to improve ECCE attendance are discussed.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Children and Youth Services Review.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 798-806

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:34:y:2012:i:4:p:798-806
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth

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