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Overview of Child Development Accounts in developing countries

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  • Meyer, Jeff
  • Masa, Rainier D.
  • Zimmerman, Jamie M.

Abstract

Child Development Accounts (CDAs) as a matter of policy have existed for some time, though predominantly in developed countries. While there are at least a few government social programs with CDA components in the developing world, such policies have yet to gain significant traction. This paper finds that despite this lack of policy movement, CDAs do exist in developing countries in a variety of forms and delivered by a diverse group of institutions. Government-linked institutions (such as savings and post banks); non-governmental institutions (such as credit unions and NGOs); and commercial financial institutions are all innovating in CDA design and delivery. This paper offers a review of how CDAs exist in developing countries, including the types of institutions offering CDAs, and design features and delivery mechanisms common among such accounts. The paper concludes with implications of this analysis for policymakers and researchers.

Suggested Citation

  • Meyer, Jeff & Masa, Rainier D. & Zimmerman, Jamie M., 2010. "Overview of Child Development Accounts in developing countries," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1561-1569, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:32:y:2010:i:11:p:1561-1569
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amanda Moore & Sondra Beverly & Mark Schreiner & Michael Sherraden & Margaret Lombe & Esther Y. N. Cho & Lissa Johnson & Rebecca Vonderlack, 2001. "Saving, IDA Programs, and Effects of IDAs: A Survey of Participants," Microeconomics 0108002, EconWPA, revised 27 Dec 2001.
    2. Ashraf Nava & Karlan Dean & Yin Wesley, 2006. "Deposit Collectors," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-24, March.
    3. Nava Ashraf & Dean Karlan & Wesley Yin, 2006. "Tying Odysseus to the Mast: Evidence From a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 635-672.
    4. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597.
    5. Case, Anne & Fertig, Angela & Paxson, Christina, 2005. "The lasting impact of childhood health and circumstance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 365-389, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gina Chowa & Mathieu Despard, 2014. "The Influence of Parental Financial Socialization on Youth’s Financial Behavior: Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 376-389, September.
    2. Jin Huang & Yunju Nam & Michael Sherraden & Margaret Clancy, 2015. "Financial Capability and Asset Accumulation for Children's Education: Evidence from an Experiment of Child Development Accounts," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 127-155, March.
    3. Huang, Jin & Sherraden, Michael & Purnell, Jason Q., 2014. "Impacts of Child Development Accounts on maternal depressive symptoms: Evidence from a randomized statewide policy experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 30-38.

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