IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/appene/v187y2017icp310-325.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Identifying key impact factors on carbon emission: Evidences from panel and time-series data of 125 countries from 1990 to 2011

Author

Listed:
  • Shuai, Chenyang
  • Shen, Liyin
  • Jiao, Liudan
  • Wu, Ya
  • Tan, Yongtao

Abstract

Global warming caused by carbon emission has been recognized as a threat to public health and welfare. Carbon emission reduction is therefore a necessary task for each country to address the severe challenges arising from global warming. This research combines the STIRPAT model with the use of the panel and time-series data to analyze the impacts of population, affluence and technology on the carbon emission of 125 countries at different income levels over the period of 1990–2011. The results show that the key impact factor (KIF) at global level is affluence, followed by technology and population in the order of their impacts on carbon emission. For countries at high-income (HI) level, technology has the greatest impact on carbon emission, while affluence has the least. Affluence, prior to technology and population, is identified as the KIF of carbon emission for countries at upper-middle-income (UMI) and lower-middle-income (LMI) levels. When it comes to the low-income (LI) level, affluence serves as the factor greatest affecting on carbon emission, and technology has the least impact. In particular, two generic patterns are identified based on the empirical results: higher income leads to greater impact of the technology and lower impact of the affluence on carbon emission. The KIFs of different income level countries identified in this study provide policy-makers and practitioners with valuable references for adopting effective policies and strategies to stimulate the global carbon emission reduction.

Suggested Citation

  • Shuai, Chenyang & Shen, Liyin & Jiao, Liudan & Wu, Ya & Tan, Yongtao, 2017. "Identifying key impact factors on carbon emission: Evidences from panel and time-series data of 125 countries from 1990 to 2011," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 310-325.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:appene:v:187:y:2017:i:c:p:310-325
    DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.11.029
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306261916316142
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Fritsch & Martina Kauffeld-Monz, 2010. "The impact of network structure on knowledge transfer: an application of social network analysis in the context of regional innovation networks," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 21-38, February.
    2. Wang, Zhaohua & Yin, Fangchao & Zhang, Yixiang & Zhang, Xian, 2012. "An empirical research on the influencing factors of regional CO2 emissions: Evidence from Beijing city, China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 277-284.
    3. Tan, Xianchun & Dong, Lele & Chen, Dexue & Gu, Baihe & Zeng, Yuan, 2016. "China’s regional CO2 emissions reduction potential: A study of Chongqing city," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 1345-1354.
    4. Li, Ming-Jia & Song, Chen-Xi & Tao, Wen-Quan, 2016. "A hybrid model for explaining the short-term dynamics of energy efficiency of China’s thermal power plants," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 738-747.
    5. Wang, Ping & Wu, Wanshui & Zhu, Bangzhu & Wei, Yiming, 2013. "Examining the impact factors of energy-related CO2 emissions using the STIRPAT model in Guangdong Province, China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 65-71.
    6. Mehrara Mohsen & Abbas ali Rezaei, 2013. "A Panel Estimation of the Relationship Between Trade Liberalization, Economic Growth and CO2 Emissions in BRICS Countries," Hyperion Economic Journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Hyperion University of Bucharest, Romania, vol. 1(4), pages 3-27, December.
    7. Wenjing Gao & Zhishuang Zhu, 2016. "The technological progress route alternative of carbon productivity promotion in China’s industrial sector," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(3), pages 1803-1815, July.
    8. Shi, Kaifang & Chen, Yun & Yu, Bailang & Xu, Tingbao & Chen, Zuoqi & Liu, Rui & Li, Linyi & Wu, Jianping, 2016. "Modeling spatiotemporal CO2 (carbon dioxide) emission dynamics in China from DMSP-OLS nighttime stable light data using panel data analysis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 523-533.
    9. Zhang, Xing-Ping & Cheng, Xiao-Mei, 2009. "Energy consumption, carbon emissions, and economic growth in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 2706-2712, August.
    10. Kao, Chihwa, 1999. "Spurious regression and residual-based tests for cointegration in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 1-44, May.
    11. Baek, Jungho, 2015. "A panel cointegration analysis of CO2 emissions, nuclear energy and income in major nuclear generating countries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 133-138.
    12. Nian, Victor & Chou, S.K. & Su, Bin & Bauly, John, 2014. "Life cycle analysis on carbon emissions from power generation – The nuclear energy example," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 68-82.
    13. Zhang, Chuanguo & Liu, Cong, 2015. "The impact of ICT industry on CO2 emissions: A regional analysis in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 12-19.
    14. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    15. Miketa, Asami & Mulder, Peter, 2005. "Energy productivity across developed and developing countries in 10 manufacturing sectors: Patterns of growth and convergence," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 429-453, May.
    16. Ockwell, David G. & Watson, Jim & MacKerron, Gordon & Pal, Prosanto & Yamin, Farhana, 2008. "Key policy considerations for facilitating low carbon technology transfer to developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 4104-4115, November.
    17. Zhang, Yue-Jun, 2013. "Speculative trading and WTI crude oil futures price movement: An empirical analysis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 394-402.
    18. Burnett, J. Wesley & Bergstrom, John C. & Wetzstein, Michael E., 2013. "Carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth in the U.S," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1014-1028.
    19. Xu, Bin & Lin, Boqiang, 2016. "Assessing CO2 emissions in China’s iron and steel industry: A dynamic vector autoregression model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 375-386.
    20. Zhou, Yang & Liu, Yansui, 2016. "Does population have a larger impact on carbon dioxide emissions than income? Evidence from a cross-regional panel analysis in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 800-809.
    21. Shimada, Koji & Tanaka, Yoshitaka & Gomi, Kei & Matsuoka, Yuzuru, 2007. "Developing a long-term local society design methodology towards a low-carbon economy: An application to Shiga Prefecture in Japan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4688-4703, September.
    22. Wang, Changjian & Wang, Fei & Zhang, Xinlin & Yang, Yu & Su, Yongxian & Ye, Yuyao & Zhang, Hongou, 2017. "Examining the driving factors of energy related carbon emissions using the extended STIRPAT model based on IPAT identity in Xinjiang," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 51-61.
    23. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
    24. Lise, Wietze, 2006. "Decomposition of CO2 emissions over 1980-2003 in Turkey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(14), pages 1841-1852, September.
    25. Shahbaz, muhammad & Solarin, Sakiru Adebola & Sbia, Rashid & Bibi, Sadia, 2015. "Does Energy Intensity Contribute to CO2 Emissions? A Trivariate Analysis in Selected African Countries," MPRA Paper 64335, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Mar 2015.
    26. Li, Huanan & Mu, Hailin & Zhang, Ming & Gui, Shusen, 2012. "Analysis of regional difference on impact factors of China’s energy – Related CO2 emissions," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 319-326.
    27. Wang, Mingwei & Che, Yue & Yang, Kai & Wang, Min & Xiong, Lijun & Huang, Yuchi, 2011. "A local-scale low-carbon plan based on the STIRPAT model and the scenario method: The case of Minhang District, Shanghai, China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 6981-6990.
    28. Chatzizacharia, Kalliopi & Benekis, Vasilis & Hatziavramidis, Dimitris, 2016. "A blueprint for an energy policy in Greece with considerations of climate change," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 382-389.
    29. Yue, Ting & Long, Ruyin & Chen, Hong & Zhao, Xin, 2013. "The optimal CO2 emissions reduction path in Jiangsu province: An expanded IPAT approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1510-1517.
    30. Ozturk, Ilhan & Bilgili, Faik, 2015. "Economic growth and biomass consumption nexus: Dynamic panel analysis for Sub-Sahara African countries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 110-116.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:appene:v:205:y:2017:i:c:p:1512-1527 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:118:y:2018:i:c:p:232-244 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:appene:v:220:y:2018:i:c:p:286-295 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:energy:v:140:y:2017:i:p1:p:1074-1086 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:appene:v:204:y:2017:i:c:p:509-524 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:appene:v:187:y:2017:i:c:p:310-325. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/405891/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.