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Farm-level perspectives regarding irrigation water prices in the Tulkarm district, Palestine

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  • Abu-Madi, Maher O.

Abstract

Agriculture consumes about 70% of water available in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Domestic and industrial users utilize 30% of the water supply. Water resource managers are considering the policy of reallocating a portion of the water supply from agriculture to other uses. It is believed that increasing irrigation water prices could influence water consumption and thus make water available for non-agricultural (more economic) uses. This paper examines the impacts of water pricing on agricultural water consumption and farming profitability and provides some guidelines for policy makers regarding water pricing as a tool to manage scarce water resources. We estimate a regression model describing agricultural water consumption as a function of water prices, irrigated land area, farm income, and irrigation frequency, using data collected in a survey of about 150 farmers in the Tulkarm district. We conclude that irrigation water prices are perceived as high and comprise a large portion of total farming expenses. Therefore, attempts to increase irrigation water prices in the Tulkarm district might jeopardize farming feasibility and might have substantial impacts on agricultural water consumption. Nevertheless, many farmers would continue farming even if the water prices were increased beyond their willingness to pay threshold.

Suggested Citation

  • Abu-Madi, Maher O., 2009. "Farm-level perspectives regarding irrigation water prices in the Tulkarm district, Palestine," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(9), pages 1344-1350, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agiwat:v:96:y:2009:i:9:p:1344-1350
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Moore, Mick, 1989. "The fruits and fallacies of neoliberalism: The case of irrigation policy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(11), pages 1733-1750, November.
    2. Tsur, Yacov & Dinar, Ariel, 1997. "The Relative Efficiency and Implementation Costs of Alternative Methods for Pricing Irrigation Water," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(2), pages 243-262, May.
    3. Berbel, J. & Gomez-Limon, J. A., 2000. "The impact of water-pricing policy in Spain: an analysis of three irrigated areas," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 219-238, March.
    4. World Bank, 2003. "Twenty-Seven Months - Intifada, Closures, and Palestinian Economic Crisis : An Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14614, The World Bank.
    5. Easter, K. W., 2005. "Cost recovery and water pricing for irrigation and drainage projects," IWMI Working Papers H046176, International Water Management Institute.
    6. Sampath, Rajan K., 1992. "Issues in irrigation pricing in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(7), pages 967-977, July.
    7. Dudu, Hasan & Chumi, Sinqobile, 2008. "Economics of irrigation water management : a literature survey with focus on partial and general equilibrium models," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4556, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Minjun Shi & Xiaojun Wang & Hong Yang & Tao Wang, 2014. "Pricing or Quota? A Solution to Water Scarcity in Oasis Regions in China: A Case Study in the Heihe River Basin," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-20, October.

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