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Transient and chronic poverty in turbulent times: Argentina 1995-2002

Author

Listed:
  • Guillermo Cruces

    () (STICERD-London School of Economics and Political Science)

  • Quentin T. Wodon

    () (The World Bank)

Abstract

Using panel data, poverty in Argentina is decomposed into transient and chronic components. Overall poverty has increased in large part due to higher chronic poverty. While many household characteristics have similar impacts on both chronic and transient poverty, there are differences. Households with self-employed workers and business owners have higher levels of transient but not chronic poverty. The reverse is observed for households with public sector workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillermo Cruces & Quentin T. Wodon, 2003. "Transient and chronic poverty in turbulent times: Argentina 1995-2002," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(3), pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-03i30003
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2003/Volume9/EB-03I30003A.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guillermo Cruces & Quentin Wodon, 2007. "Risk-adjusted poverty in Argentina: measurement and determinants," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(7), pages 1189-1214.
    2. Guillermo Cruces & Quentin Wodon, 2003. "Argentina’s crises and the Poor, 1995-2002," Económica, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, vol. 0(1-2), pages 55-96, January-D.
    3. Khan, Shakeeb & Powell, James L., 2001. "Two-step estimation of semiparametric censored regression models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 103(1-2), pages 73-110, July.
    4. Stefan Dercon & Pramila Krishnan, 2000. "Vulnerability, seasonality and poverty in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 25-53.
    5. Kenneth Y. Chay & James L. Powell, 2001. "Semiparametric Censored Regression Models," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 29-42, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Duclos, Jean-Yves & Araar, Abdelkrim & Giles, John, 2010. "Chronic and transient poverty: Measurement and estimation, with evidence from China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 266-277, March.
    2. Guillermo Cruces & Quentin Wodon, 2007. "Risk-adjusted poverty in Argentina: measurement and determinants," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(7), pages 1189-1214.
    3. repec:sbe:breart:v:33:y:2013:i:1:a:8944 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Florent Bresson & Jean-Yves Duclos, 2015. "Intertemporal poverty comparisons," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(3), pages 567-616, March.
    5. Walelign, Solomon Zena & Charlery, Lindy & Smith-Hall, Carsten & Chhetri, Bir Bahadur Khanal & Larsen, Helle Overgaard, 2016. "Environmental income improves household-level poverty assessments and dynamics," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 23-35.
    6. repec:eee:wdevel:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:266-278 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Teguh, Dartanto & Nurkholis, Nurkholis, 2011. "Finding out of the Determinants of Poverty Dynamics in Indonesia: Evidence from Panel Data," MPRA Paper 41185, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Luis Beccaria & Roxana Maurizio & Ana Fernández & Paula Monsalvo & Mariana Álvarez, 2013. "Urban poverty and labor market dynamics in five Latin American countries: 2003–2008," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(4), pages 555-580, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution

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