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Horizontal And Vertical Contexts On Europeans’ Well-Being

Author

Listed:
  • Fernando BRUNA
  • Isabel NEIRA
  • Marta PORTELA

Abstract

This paper analyzes the economic and social contextual determinants of individual life satisfaction and happiness across Europe. We provide new theoretical and empirical arguments about the consequences of horizontal and vertical spatial dependences in multilevel models. Using individual European data we estimate a random effects spatial lag of X (SLX) hierarchical model, which allows for local spillovers of contextual factors to neighboring regions defined at several aggregation levels. Our results not only confirm the role of regional contextual factors but the significance of the spatial lags of those contextual factors, probably indicating the presence of clustered latent variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando BRUNA & Isabel NEIRA & Marta PORTELA, 2019. "Horizontal And Vertical Contexts On Europeans’ Well-Being," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 19(2), pages 37-56.
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:19:y:2019:i:2_3
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    File URL: http://www.usc.es/~economet/reviews/aeid1923.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Isabel Neira & Fernando Bruna & Marta Portela & Adela García-Aracil, 2018. "Individual Well-Being, Geographical Heterogeneity and Social Capital," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 1067-1090, April.
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    6. M. Pittau & Roberto Zelli & Andrew Gelman, 2010. "Economic Disparities and Life Satisfaction in European Regions," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 96(2), pages 339-361, April.
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    8. repec:mpr:mprres:6363 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Life satisfaction; happiness; social capital; multilevel models; spatial lag of X model; spillovers.;

    JEL classification:

    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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