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Financial Globalisation and Emerging Markets Volatility

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  • Christina Leijonhufvud

Abstract

The volatility of capital flows to emerging market (EM) countries and frequency of financial crises have imposed high welfare costs on the countries involved. The empirical literature provides, at best, a mixed picture on the relationship between long‐run EM country growth and financial integration. Meanwhile, the prevailing policy discourse regarding reform of the international financial system remains incomplete: the focus has largely been on either institutional and policy measures required of EM countries or international crisis‐resolution procedures. The role played by private financial markets and institutions in the developed world has not received adequate attention. This paper describes some of the structural features inherent in today's financial markets that directly contribute to the instability in EM capital flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Christina Leijonhufvud, 2007. "Financial Globalisation and Emerging Markets Volatility," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(12), pages 1817-1842, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:30:y:2007:i:12:p:1817-1842
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9701.2007.01077.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9701.2007.01077.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wendy Dobson & Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Hyun Koo Cho, 2001. "World Capital Markets: Challenge to the G-10," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 328.
    2. John Williamson, 2005. "Curbing the Boom-Bust Cycle: Stabilizing Capital Flows to Emerging Markets," Peterson Institute Press: Policy Analyses in International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa75, October.
    3. Aaron Tornell & Frank Westermann, 2005. "Boom-Bust Cycles and Financial Liberalization," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262201593.
    4. Arvind Subramanian & Raghuram G. Rajan & Eswar S. Prasad, 2006. "Patterns of international capital flows and their implications for economic development," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 119-158.
    5. Roubini, Nouriel & Brad Setser, 2004. "Bailouts or Bail-ins? Responding to Financial Crises in Emerging Economies," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 378.
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    Cited by:

    1. Costel Istrate & Bogdan Robu Ioan, 2014. "L'Analyse De L'Influence Des Composants Des Etats Financiers Sur La Capitalisation Boursière Des Entreprises Roumaines, Dans Les Conditions De La Crise," Post-Print hal-01899159, HAL.
    2. Agosin, Manuel R. & Huaita, Franklin, 2012. "Overreaction in capital flows to emerging markets: Booms and sudden stops," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 1140-1155.
    3. Mendoza, Ronald U., 2010. "Was the Asian crisis a wake-up call?: Foreign reserves as self-protection," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-19, February.
    4. repec:bla:worlde:v:42:y:2019:i:2:p:530-551 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Anton A. Setyawan & Basu Swastha Dharmmesta & BΜ Purwanto & Sahid Susilo Nugroho, 2015. "Model of Relationship Marketing and Power Asymmetry in Indonesia Retail Industry," International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), vol. 0(1), pages 108-127.
    6. Lukas Menkhoff, 2013. "Foreign Exchange Intervention in Emerging Markets: A Survey of Empirical Studies," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(9), pages 1187-1208, September.
    7. Shujie Yao & Dan Luo, 2009. "The Economic Psychology of Stock Market Bubbles in China," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(5), pages 667-691, May.
    8. Anni Huang & Narayan Kundan Kishor, 2019. "The rise of dollar credit in emerging market economies and US monetary policy," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 530-551, February.
    9. Hassan, Kamrul & Hoque, Ariful & Gasbarro, Dominic, 2017. "Sovereign default risk linkage: Implication for portfolio diversification," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-16.
    10. Manuel R. Agosin & Franklin Huaita, 2011. "Capital flows to emerging economies: Minsky in the tropics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(4), pages 663-683.

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