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Migration, Transfers and Child Labor

Author

Listed:
  • Ralitza Dimova
  • Gil S. Epstein
  • Ira N. Gang

Abstract

We examine agricultural child labor in the context of emigration, transfers and the ability to hire outside labor. We start by developing a theoretical background and show how hiring labor from outside the household and transfers to the household might induce a reduction in children's working hours. Analysis using Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS) data on the Kagera region in Tanzania lend support to the hypothesis that both emigration and remittances reduce child labor.

Suggested Citation

  • Ralitza Dimova & Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2015. "Migration, Transfers and Child Labor," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 735-747, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:19:y:2015:i:3:p:735-747
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/rode.12156
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:laf:wpaper:201105 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Zhang, Yi & Matz, Julia Anna, 2017. "On the train to brain gain in rural China," Discussion Papers 252443, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    3. Ebeke, Christian Hubert, 2012. "The power of remittances on the international prevalence of child labor," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 452-462.
    4. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal, 2014. "Education, Genre et Transferts de fonds des migrants: Quelles interactions dans le Maroc rural ?
      [Education, Gender and Remittances: What interactions in rural Morocco?]
      ," MPRA Paper 57051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. repec:eee:jcecon:v:46:y:2018:i:2:p:480-494 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah, 2014. "Household Welfare, International Migration And Children Time Allocation In Rural Morocco," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(2), pages 75-95, June.
    7. Bouoiyour, Jamal, 2013. "Transferts de fonds, éducation et travail des enfants au Maroc: Une analyse par score de propension
      [Remittances, Education and Child labor in Morocco: A propensity score matching approach]
      ," MPRA Paper 46063, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General

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