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Are Remittances an Effective Mechanism for Development? Evidence from Tajikistan, 1999--2007

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  • Cynthia Buckley
  • Erin Trouth Hofmann

Abstract

In many remittance-receiving countries, evidence linking remittances to household economic stability and investment is limited. Using three cross-sectional national surveys (1999, 2003, 2007) we compare remittance-receiving to non-remittance households in Tajikistan, a country highly dependent on remittances. Exploring household perceptions of financial security, wealth and entrepreneurial activity, across a period of rising remittance reliance, we find that households receiving remittances are not more economically stabile, wealthier, or entrepreneurial than non-remittance households. Findings highlight the importance of conceptualising remittances as a process influenced by the developmental contexts within receiving countries, and question previous assumptions concerning development pathways.

Suggested Citation

  • Cynthia Buckley & Erin Trouth Hofmann, 2012. "Are Remittances an Effective Mechanism for Development? Evidence from Tajikistan, 1999--2007," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(8), pages 1121-1138, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:48:y:2012:i:8:p:1121-1138
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2012.688816
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220388.2012.688816
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Samuel Munzele Maimbo & Dilip Ratha, 2005. "Remittances: Development Impact and Future Prospects," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7339.
    2. World Bank, 2006. "Tajikistan Policy Note : Enhancing the Development Impact of Remittances," World Bank Other Operational Studies 19457, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2016. "Gender Dimensions of Inequality in the Countries of Central Asia, South Caucasus, and Western CIS," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_858, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Ralitza Dimova & Gil S. Epstein & Ira N. Gang, 2015. "Migration, Transfers and Child Labor," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 735-747, August.
    3. repec:jed:journl:v:42:y:2017:i:2:p:1-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gloria Clarissa O. Dzeha, 2016. "The decipher, theory or empirics: a review of remittance studies," African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 113-134.
    5. Kristina Meier, 2014. "Low-Skilled Labor Migration in Tajikistan: Determinants and Effects on Expenditure Patterns," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1433, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Wim Naudé & Henri Bezuidenhout, 2014. "Migrant Remittances Provide Resilience Against Disasters in Africa," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 42(1), pages 79-90, March.

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