IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/rdevec/v19y2015i3p710-724.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Institutions and Cultural Heterogeneity as Determinants of National Income: A Random-coefficients Stochastic Frontier Model

Author

Listed:
  • Maria Baquero Forero
  • Takanori Ida
  • Toshifumi Kuroda

Abstract

Previous research on total factor productivity (TFP) shows that cross-country differences in income cannot be fully explained by stocks of capital (K), labor (L) and human capital (E). In addition, the omission of major production inputs or the use of proxies to estimate unobservable inputs leads to biased estimation results. This study addresses the above issues by employing a novel econometric approach and provides empirical evidence that a fixed production input, and therefore a country's income, is positively correlated with the existence of British-style institutions and negatively correlated with cultural heterogeneity and Spanish-style institutions. Our methodology is twofold. First, using data for 62 countries from 1980 to 2004, we regressed a random-coefficients stochastic production frontier that allows estimating a fixed unobservable production input without using proxies. Second, the estimated fixed production input is shown to be related to colonial institutions and cultural heterogeneity by means of ordinary least squares and feasible generalized least squares regressions.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Baquero Forero & Takanori Ida & Toshifumi Kuroda, 2015. "Institutions and Cultural Heterogeneity as Determinants of National Income: A Random-coefficients Stochastic Frontier Model," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 710-724, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:19:y:2015:i:3:p:710-724
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/rode.12153
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    2. Koop, Gary & Osiewalski, Jacek & Steel, Mark F J, 2000. "A Stochastic Frontier Analysis of Output Level and Growth in Poland and Western Economies," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 185-202.
    3. Jondrow, James & Knox Lovell, C. A. & Materov, Ivan S. & Schmidt, Peter, 1982. "On the estimation of technical inefficiency in the stochastic frontier production function model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2-3), pages 233-238, August.
    4. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    5. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
    6. Antonio Álvarez & Carlos Arias & William Greene, 2004. "Accounting for unobservables in production models:management and inefficiency," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2004/72, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    7. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
    8. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Mefford, Robert N, 1986. "Introducing Management into the Production Function," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(1), pages 96-104, February.
    10. Efthymios G. Tsionas, 2002. "Stochastic frontier models with random coefficients," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 127-147.
    11. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, 2003. "Ethnic Diversity and Economic Performance," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2028, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    12. Joaquin Maudos & Jose Manuel Pastor & Lorenzo Serrano, 2003. "Human capital in OECD countries: Technical change, efficiency and productivity," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 419-435.
    13. Bhattacharyya, Sambit, 2009. "Unbundled institutions, human capital and growth," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 106-120, March.
    14. Jesus Felipe, 1999. "Total factor productivity growth in East Asia: A critical survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 1-41.
    15. Licht, Amir N. & Goldschmidt, Chanan & Schwartz, Shalom H., 2007. "Culture rules: The foundations of the rule of law and other norms of governance," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 659-688, December.
    16. Sangho Kim & Young Hoon Lee, 2006. "The productivity debate of East Asia revisited: a stochastic frontier approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(14), pages 1697-1706.
    17. Woodberry, Robert D., 2012. "The Missionary Roots of Liberal Democracy," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 244-274, May.
    18. Fearon, James D, 2003. "Ethnic and Cultural Diversity by Country," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 195-222, June.
    19. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2002. "Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1231-1294.
    20. Greene, William, 2005. "Reconsidering heterogeneity in panel data estimators of the stochastic frontier model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 126(2), pages 269-303, June.
    21. Albert Wijeweera & Renato Villano & Brian Dollery, 2010. "Economic growth and FDI inflows:a stochastic frontier analysis," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 43(2), pages 143-158, January-M.
    22. Huynh, Kim P. & Jacho-Chávez, David T., 2009. "Growth and governance: A nonparametric analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 121-143, March.
    23. Antonio Alvarez & Carlos Arias, 2003. "Diseconomies of Size with Fixed Managerial Ability," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 134-142.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:19:y:2015:i:3:p:710-724. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1363-6669 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.