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Welfare-increasing third-degree price discrimination

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  • Simon Cowan

Abstract

The welfare and output effects of monopoly third-degree price discrimination are analyzed when inverse demand functions are parallel. Welfare is higher with discrimination than with a uniform price when demand functions are derived from the logistic distribution, and from a more general class of distributions. The sufficient condition in Varian (1985) for a welfare increase holds for these demand functions. Total output is higher with discrimination for a large set of demand functions including those derived from strictly log-concave distributions with increasing cost pass-through, such as the normal, logistic and extreme value, and standard log-convex demands.
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  • Simon Cowan, 2016. "Welfare-increasing third-degree price discrimination," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 47(2), pages 326-340, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:randje:v:47:y:2016:i:2:p:326-340
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/rand.2016.47.issue-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Takanori Adachi & Michal Fabinger, 2017. "Multi-Dimensional Pass-Through and Welfare Measures under Imperfect Competition," Papers 1702.04967, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2018.
    2. Dirk Bergemann & Benjamin Brooks & Stephen Morris, 2015. "The Limits of Price Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(3), pages 921-957, March.
    3. Aguirre, Iñaki, 2019. "Oligopoly price discrimination, competitive pressure and total output," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 13, pages 1-16.
    4. Dertwinkel-Kalt, Markus & Wey, Christian, 2020. "Third-degree price discrimination in oligopoly when markets are covered," DICE Discussion Papers 336, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    5. Jong-Hee Hahn & Chan KIm, 2018. "Input price discrimination with differentiated final products," Working papers 2018rwp-118, Yonsei University, Yonsei Economics Research Institute.
    6. Felipe Avilés-Lucero & Andre Boik, 2018. "Wholesale most-favored-nation clauses and price discrimination with negative consumption externalities: equivalence results," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 54(3), pages 266-291, December.
    7. Takanori Adachi & Muhammad Michal Fabinger, 2017. "Multi-Dimensional Pass-Through, Incidence, and the Welfare Burden of Taxation in Oligopoly," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1040, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    8. John Vickers, 2020. "Direct Welfare Analysis of Relative Price Regulation," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(1), pages 40-51, March.
    9. Takanori Adachi & Michal Fabinger, 2017. "Multi-Dimensional Pass-Through, Incidence, and the Welfare Burden of Taxation in Oligopoly," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1043, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    10. Zhu Wang & Julian Wright, 2018. "Should platforms be allowed to charge ad valorem fees?," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 739-760, September.
    11. Shota Ichihashi, 2020. "Online Privacy and Information Disclosure by Consumers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 110(2), pages 569-595, February.
    12. Czerny, Achim I. & Zhang, Anming, 2014. "Airport congestion pricing when airlines price discriminate," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 77-89.
    13. Tuo Wang & Michael Y. Hu, 2019. "Differential pricing with consumers’ valuation uncertainty by a monopoly," Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 18(3), pages 247-255, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D42 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Monopoly
    • L12 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Monopoly; Monopolization Strategies
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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