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Market Responses To Climate Stress: Rice In Java In The 1930s

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  • Pierre Van Der Eng

Abstract

Do markets in less‐developed countries abate consequences of climate stress? Using changes in regional rice prices across the 19 regions in Java, Indonesia, during 1935–40, this paper will assess how rice markets responded to variations in rainfall, which is an important factor in rice production. It finds that rice markets were highly integrated across Java. The El Niño‐induced episodes of lower than usual rainfall in 1935 and 1940 did not have a negative effect on levels and variations in regional rice prices, nor did they have adverse consequences for the supply of rice. Adaptive responses of firms specialising in the trade of rice are argued to have mitigated regional deficiencies in food production caused by climate stress.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre Van Der Eng, 2010. "Market Responses To Climate Stress: Rice In Java In The 1930s," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 50(1), pages 62-79, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:50:y:2010:i:1:p:62-79
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8446.2009.00272.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stern,Nicholas, 2007. "The Economics of Climate Change," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521700801, November.
    2. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2007. "Making Famine History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(1), pages 5-38, March.
    3. Marks, Daan, 2010. "Unity or diversity? On the integration and efficiency of rice markets in Indonesia, c. 1920-2006," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 310-324, July.
    4. Van Zanden, Jan Luiten, 2004. "On the Efficiency of Markets for Agricultural Products: Rice Prices and Capital Markets in Java, 1823–1853," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 1028-1055, December.
    5. Ellis,Frank, 1992. "Agricultural Policies in Developing Countries," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521395847, November.
    6. Peter H. Lindert, 2000. "Shifting Ground: The Changing Agricultural Soils of China and Indonesia," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262122278, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dobes Leo & Jotzo Frank & Stern David I., 2014. "The Economics of Global Climate Change: A Historical Literature Review," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 65(3), pages 281-320, December.
    2. Dobes, Leo, 2012. "Adaptation to Climate Change: Formulating Policy under Uncertainty," Working Papers 249390, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    3. Gregg Huff & Gillian Huff, 2015. "Urban growth and change in 1940s Southeast Asia," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(2), pages 522-547, May.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N55 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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