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Wind Power and Job Creation

Author

Listed:
  • Luigi Aldieri

    (Department of Economic and Statistical Sciences, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy)

  • Jonas Grafström

    (Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, The Ratio Institute and Luleå University of Technology, SE-11359 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Kristoffer Sundström

    (The Ratio Institute, SE-11359 Stockholm, Sweden)

  • Concetto Paolo Vinci

    (Department of Economic and Statistical Sciences, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide a global overview of job effects per MW of wind power installations, which will enable improved decision-making and modeling of future wind-power projects. We found indications that job creation connected to wind-power installations is rather limited. In total, 17 peer-reviewed articles and 10 reports/non-peer-reviewed papers between 2001 and 2019 were assessed. Our three major policy conclusions are as follows: (a) job creation seems to be limited; (b) each new project should consider a unique assessment, since all projects have been undertaken within different institutional frameworks, labor markets, and during separate years, meaning that the technology is not comparable; and (c) the number of jobs depends on the labor intensity of the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Luigi Aldieri & Jonas Grafström & Kristoffer Sundström & Concetto Paolo Vinci, 2019. "Wind Power and Job Creation," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(1), pages 1-23, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:12:y:2019:i:1:p:45-:d:299619
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    References listed on IDEAS

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