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Carbon offsets with endogenous environmental policy

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  • Strand, Jon

Abstract

Interests in obtaining carbon offsets in host countries for CDM projects may serve as an obstacle to implementing more stringent general environmental policies in the same countries. A relatively lax environmental policy, whereby carbon emissions remain high, can be advantageous for such countries as it leaves them with a higher than otherwise scope for future emissions reductions through CDM and other offset projects. In this paper, the potential to affect the availability of future CDM projects is shown to distort environmental and energy policies of CDM host countries, in two ways. First, policies to reduce the use of fossil energy are weakened. This in turn weakens private sector incentives to switch to lower-carbon technology through CDM projects. CDM host governments then also find it attractive to subsidize this switch, in order to maximize the country's advantage from the CDM.

Suggested Citation

  • Strand, Jon, 2011. "Carbon offsets with endogenous environmental policy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 371-378, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:33:y:2011:i:2:p:371-378
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fischer, Carolyn, 2005. "Project-based mechanisms for emissions reductions: balancing trade-offs with baselines," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(14), pages 1807-1823, September.
    2. Greiner, Sandra & Michaelowa, Axel, 2003. "Defining Investment Additionality for CDM projects--practical approaches," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1007-1015, August.
    3. Hagem, Cathrine, 2009. "The clean development mechanism versus international permit trading: The effect on technological change," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 1-12, January.
    4. Florens Flues & Axel Michaelowa & Katharina Michaelowa, 2010. "What determines UN approval of greenhouse gas emission reduction projects in developing countries?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 1-24, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Trotter, Ian Michael & da Cunha, Dênis Antônio & Féres, José Gustavo, 2015. "The relationships between CDM project characteristics and CER market prices," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 158-167.
    2. Qiu, Cheng & Colson, Gregory & Wetzstein, Michael, 2014. "An ethanol blend wall shift is prone to increase petroleum gasoline demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 160-165.
    3. van Benthem, Arthur & Kerr, Suzi, 2013. "Scale and transfers in international emissions offset programs," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 31-46.
    4. Suzi Kerr & Adam Millard-Ball, 2012. "Cooperation to Reduce Developing Country Emissions," Working Papers 12_03, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    5. Strand, Jon & Rosendahl, Knut Einar, 2012. "Global emissions effects of CDM projects with relative baselines," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 533-548.

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