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Workers' Perceptions of Job Insecurity: Do Job Security Guarantees Work?

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  • Alex Bryson
  • Lorenzo Cappellari
  • Claudio Lucifora

Abstract

We investigate the effect of employer job security guarantees on employee perceptions of job insecurity. Using linked employer–employee data from the 1998 British Workplace Employee Relations Survey, we find job security guarantees reduce employee perceptions of job insecurity. This finding is robust to endogenous selection of job security guarantees by employers engaging in organizational change and workforce reductions. Furthermore, there is no evidence that increased job security through job guarantees results in greater work intensification, stress, or lower job satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson & Lorenzo Cappellari & Claudio Lucifora, 2009. "Workers' Perceptions of Job Insecurity: Do Job Security Guarantees Work?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 177-196, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:23:y:2009:i:s1:p:177-196
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9914.2008.00433.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2008.00433.x
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    2. Goerke, Laszlo, 2020. "Trade Unions and Corporate Social Responsibility," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224609, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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