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Immigration Policy, Equilibrium Unemployment, and Underinvestment in Human Capital

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  • Christian Lumpe
  • Benjamin Weigert

Abstract

We analyse the impact of different immigration policies on human capital investment in a search-theoretic model. This class of models features unemployment and underinvestment in human capital. The underinvestment in human capital can be solved by combining immigration policy with appropriate education subsidies. Extending the model with respect to different skill groups allows to analyse the observed bimodal skilled immigration of the USA. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2009.

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  • Christian Lumpe & Benjamin Weigert, 2009. "Immigration Policy, Equilibrium Unemployment, and Underinvestment in Human Capital," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(1), pages 97-130, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:23:y:2009:i:1:p:97-130
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Emily A. Beam & David McKenzie & Dean Yang, 2016. "Unilateral Facilitation Does Not Raise International Labor Migration from the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(2), pages 323-368.
    2. José Silva & Javier Vázquez-Grenno, 2011. "The ins and outs of unemployment and the assimilation of recent immigrants in Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1309-1330, October.

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