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Is There A Rural/Urban Export Gap?

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  • E. Anthon Eff
  • Steven G. Livingston

Abstract

There is growing concern, particularly in policy circles, that rural manufacturing plants may be less likely to export than metro area plants, and that this may exacerbate the economic difficulties of rural America. A variety of reasons have been offered to expect this export gap, but little empirical work has been done. Using a database of all manufacturing establishments in seven southeastern states and the county and/or zip code-level characteristics of their environment, we find that rural plants are indeed somewhat less likely to export than their urban counterparts. Though there are several explanations for the existence of this gap, factors specific to the rural environment-lower levels of human capital and information externalities-are its largest source. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2007

Suggested Citation

  • E. Anthon Eff & Steven G. Livingston, 2007. "Is There A Rural/Urban Export Gap?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 339-363.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:47:y:2007:i:2:p:339-363
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    Cited by:

    1. Chang, Shao-Chi & Chen, Sheng-Syan & Chou, Robin K. & Lin, Yueh-Hsiang, 2012. "Local sports sentiment and returns of locally headquartered stocks: A firm-level analysis," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 309-318.
    2. repec:ces:ifodre:v:15:y:2008:i:01:p:s.21-32 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Thomas Gries & Wim Naudé & Marianne Matthee, 2009. "The Optimal Distance To Port For Exporting Firms," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 513-528.
    4. Sabine Engelmann & Michaela Fuchs, 2008. "Bestimmungsfaktoren der Unterschiede einzelbetrieblicher Exportaktivitäten in Ost- und Westdeutschland," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(01), pages 21-32, 02.
    5. Shu-Hen Chiang, 2014. "The dilemma of "Twin Cities": is the suburban dependence hypothesis applicable?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 149-163, June.

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