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THE ADOPTION OF STATE ELECTRICITY REGULATION: THE ROLE OF INTEREST GROUPS -super-

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  • CHRISTOPHER R. KNITTEL

Abstract

This paper examines the adoption of state electricity regulation around the beginning of the 20th century. I model this decision as a hazard rate to determine what influenced the adoption of state regulation. I find that adoption is positively correlated with capacity shortages, greater wealth and lower residential electricity penetration rates. These results suggest that state regulation responded to regulatory inefficiencies and residential consumer interests. In addition, adoption rates were higher in states that had a strong industrial and coal mining presence. These results are consistent with the interest group and contracting theories of regulation. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2006.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher R. Knittel, 2006. "THE ADOPTION OF STATE ELECTRICITY REGULATION: THE ROLE OF INTEREST GROUPS -super-," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 201-222, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jindec:v:54:y:2006:i:2:p:201-222
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Palmer, Karen & Ando, Amy, 1998. "Getting on the Map: The Political Economy of State-Level Electricity Restructuring," Discussion Papers dp-98-19-rev, Resources For the Future.
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    Cited by:

    1. Craig, J. Dean, 2016. "Motivations for market restructuring: Evidence from U.S. electricity deregulation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 162-167.
    2. Kitchens, Carl T. & Jaworski, Taylor, 2017. "Ownership and the price of residential electricity: Evidence from the United States, 1935–1940," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 53-61.
    3. Gray, Rowena, 2013. "Taking technology to task: The skill content of technological change in early twentieth century United States," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 351-367.
    4. Steffen Jenner & Lotte Ovaere & Stephan Schindele, 2013. "The Impact of Private Interest Contributions on RPS Adoption," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(3), pages 411-423, November.
    5. Antonio Estache & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2010. "What Anti-Corruption Policy Can Learn from Theories of Sector Regulation," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2010-033, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    6. Antonio Estache & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2011. "Anti-Corruption Policy in Theories of Sector Regulation," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, Volume Two, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Robert Michaels, 2008. "Electricity Market Monitoring and the Economics of Regulation," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 32(3), pages 197-216, May.
    8. Witold J. Henisz & Bennet A. Zelner & Mauro F. Guillen, 2004. "International Coercion, Emulation and Policy Diffusion: Market-Oriented Infrastructure Reforms, 1977-1999," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-713, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    9. Steffen Jenner, Gabriel Chan, Rolf Frankenberger, and Mathias Gabel, 2012. "What Drives States to Support Renewable Energy?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).

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