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Getting on the Map: The Political Economy of State-Level Electricity Restructuring

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  • Palmer, Karen

    () (Resources for the Future)

  • Ando, Amy

Abstract

Retail competition in electricity markets is expected to lead to more efficient electricity supply, lower electricity prices, more innovation by suppliers and a greater variety of electric power service packages. However, only a handful of states have currently gone so far as to pass legislation and/or make regulatory decisions to establish retail wheeling. This paper analyzes a variety of factors that may influence the rate at which legislators and regulators move towards establishing retail competition. In general, we find that where one interest group dominates others in the struggle for influence over the decision makers, the net effect seems to push a state forward more quickly when retail wheeling is expected to yield large efficiency gains.

Suggested Citation

  • Palmer, Karen & Ando, Amy, 1998. "Getting on the Map: The Political Economy of State-Level Electricity Restructuring," Discussion Papers dp-98-19-rev, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-98-19-rev
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Palmer, Karen & Brennan, Timothy & Martinez, Salvador, 2001. "Implementing Electricity Restructuring: Policies, Potholes, and Prospects," Discussion Papers dp-01-62-, Resources For the Future.
    2. James Bushnell, 2011. "Building Blocks: Investment in Renewable and Nonrenewable Technologies," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/53, European University Institute.
    3. Faye Steiner, 2004. "The Market Response to Restructuring: A Behavioral Model," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 59-80, January.
    4. Bushnell, James, 2010. "Building Blocks: Investment in Renewable and Non-Renewable Technologies," Staff General Research Papers Archive 31546, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Meredith Fowlie, 2010. "Emissions Trading, Electricity Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 837-869, June.
    6. Harrington, Winston & Krupnick, Alan J. & Alberini, Anna, 2001. "Overcoming public aversion to congestion pricing," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, pages 87-105.
    7. Nagayama, Hiroaki, 2010. "Impacts on investments, and transmission/distribution loss through power sector reforms," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3453-3467, July.
    8. Vladimir Hlasny, 2011. "The Political Economy of Deregulation in the US Gas Distribution Market," Chapters,in: Does Economic Governance Matter?, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Witold J. Henisz & Bennet A. Zelner & Mauro F. Guillen, 2004. "International Coercion, Emulation and Policy Diffusion: Market-Oriented Infrastructure Reforms, 1977-1999," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-713, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    10. Burtraw, Dallas & Palmer, Karen, 2005. "The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Restructuring: Looking Back and Looking Forward," Discussion Papers dp-05-07, Resources For the Future.
    11. Chang, Chun Ping & Berdiev, Aziz N., 2011. "The political economy of energy regulation in OECD countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 816-825, September.
    12. Nagayama, Hiroaki, 2009. "Electric power sector reform liberalization models and electric power prices in developing countries: An empirical analysis using international panel data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 463-472, May.
    13. Sharabaroff, Alexander & Boyd, Roy & Chimeli, Ariaster, 2009. "The environmental and efficiency effects of restructuring on the electric power sector in the United States: An empirical analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4884-4893, November.
    14. Donald N. Dewees, 2006. "Electricity Restructuring and Regulation in the Provinces: Ontario and Beyond," Working Papers tecipa-205, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    15. Michel Berthélemy & Petyo Bonev & Damien Dussaux & Magnus Söderberg, 2017. "Methods for strengthening a weak instrument in the case of a persistent treatment," GRI Working Papers 265, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    16. Mozumder, Pallab & Marathe, Achla, 2004. "Gains from an integrated market for tradable renewable energy credits," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 259-272, July.
    17. Paroma Sanyal, 2005. "Powering a Green Progress: The Effect of Electricity Deregulation on Environmental Research," Industrial Organization 0504015, EconWPA.
    18. Delmas, Magali & Tokat, Yesim, 2003. "Deregulation Process, Governance Structures and Efficiency: The U.S. Electric Utility Sector," Research Papers 1790, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    19. Sanyal, Paroma & Bulan, Laarni T., 2011. "Regulatory risk, market uncertainties, and firm financing choices: Evidence from U.S. Electricity Market Restructuring," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 248-268, June.

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