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What Drives States to Support Renewable Energy?

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  • Steffen Jenner, Gabriel Chan, Rolf Frankenberger, and Mathias Gabel

Abstract

Why do states support electricity generation from renewable energy sources? Lyon/ Yin (2010), Chandler (2009), and Huang et al. (2007) have answered this question for the adoption of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) at the U.S. state level. This article supplements their work by testing the core hypotheses on the EU27 sample between 1990 and 2010. Furthermore, the article asks why the majority of EU states relies on feed-in-tariffs (FIT). The study conducts logistic time series cross-section regression analyses that run on a hazard model. Evidence in support of private interest theory and public interest theory is provided. (a) The existence of a solar energy association increases the probability of a state to adopt regulation. (b) Solar radiation, and (c) the unemployment rate also increase the odds. (d) Electricity market concentration decreases the probability of transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Steffen Jenner, Gabriel Chan, Rolf Frankenberger, and Mathias Gabel, 2012. "What Drives States to Support Renewable Energy?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:33-2-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gawel, Erik & Strunz, Sebastian & Lehmann, Paul, 2014. "A public choice view on the climate and energy policy mix in the EU — How do the emissions trading scheme and support for renewable energies interact?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 175-182.
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:376-381 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Strunz, Sebastian & Gawel, Erik & Lehmann, Paul, 2016. "The political economy of renewable energy policies in Germany and the EU," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 33-41.
    4. Adrienne M. Ohler, 2015. "Factors affecting the rise of renewable energy in the U.S.: Concern over environmental quality or rising unemployment?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    5. Lee, Donghyun & Kim, Minki & Lee, Jungyoun, 2016. "Adoption of green electricity policies: Investigating the role of environmental attitudes via big data-driven search-queries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 187-201.
    6. Patrice Bougette & Christophe Charlier, 2017. "Antidumping and Feed-In Tariffs as Good Buddies? Modeling the EU-China Solar Panel Dispute," GREDEG Working Papers 2017-17, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    7. Jenner, Steffen & Groba, Felix & Indvik, Joe, 2013. "Assessing the strength and effectiveness of renewable electricity feed-in tariffs in European Union countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 385-401.
    8. Thomas P. Tangerås, 2015. "Renewable Electricity Policy and Market Integration," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    9. Pablo Río & Miguel Tarancón & Cristina Peñasco, 2014. "The determinants of support levels for wind energy in the European Union. An econometric study," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 391-410, April.
    10. Gormus, N. Alper & Soytas, Ugur & Diltz, J. David, 2014. "Volatility transmission between energy-related asset classes," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 246-259.
    11. Schaffer, Lena Maria & Bernauer, Thomas, 2014. "Explaining government choices for promoting renewable energy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 15-27.
    12. repec:aen:journl:ej38-si1-argentiero is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:eee:rensus:v:81:y:2018:i:p2:p:2335-2342 is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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