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External Norms and Systematically Observed Norms

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  • Shintaro Tamate

Abstract

type="main"> Both Amartya Sen and behavioural economics criticize the rationality assumption and attempt to make it more realistic so that it can explain individuals' real and non-trivial normative behaviours. However, their criteria to determine the triviality of a behaviour are quite different. Sen regards a behaviour as non-trivial if such a behaviour is judged to be ethically meaningful, while behavioural economics attends to systematic biases in behaviours. Because of this difference, the predictive analysis of each approach has distinct merit and demerit. Specifying a certain external norm enables us to analyse the interaction of complicated normative behaviours.

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  • Shintaro Tamate, 2015. "External Norms and Systematically Observed Norms," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 247-259, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:66:y:2015:i:2:p:247-259
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