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Education, Innovation and Long-Run Growth

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  • Katsuhiko Hori
  • Katsunori Yamada

Abstract

This study augments a second-generation Schumpeterian growth model to employ human capital explicitly. We clarify the general-equilibrium interactions of subsidy policies to R&D and human capital accumulation in a unified framework. Despite a standard intuition that subsidizing these growth-enhancing activities is always mutually growth promoting, we find asymmetric effects for subsidies on R&D and those on education. Our theoretical result of asymmetric policy effects provides an important empirical caveat that empirical researchers may find false negative relationships between education subsidies and the output growth rate, if they merely rely on the standard human capital model.
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Suggested Citation

  • Katsuhiko Hori & Katsunori Yamada, 2013. "Education, Innovation and Long-Run Growth," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 64(3), pages 295-318, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:64:y:2013:i:3:p:295-318
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-5876.2012.00588.x
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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