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Non-Reciprocal Trade Preferences and the Role of Compliance Costs in the Agricultural Sector: Exports to the EU


  • Mariarosaria Agostino
  • Federica Demaria
  • Francesco Trivieri


We investigate whether non-reciprocal preferential regimes granted by the European Union have an impact on agricultural export flows from beneficiary countries while accounting for the costs of compliance that may prevent exporters from taking full advantage of potential benefits. Compliance costs are heterogeneous and difficult to measure. We proxy their influence and specify a model that allows for a different preferential margin impact according to the proxy costs. Adopting the gravity framework and using a sample of 554 lines of agricultural products for 131 developing countries in 2002, we find that the costs of compliance play a role in making the schemes work: the lower the costs, the greater the impact of the preferential margins. Moreover, the estimated margin effect differs between different regimes. Copyright (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 The Agricultural Economics Society.

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  • Mariarosaria Agostino & Federica Demaria & Francesco Trivieri, 2010. "Non-Reciprocal Trade Preferences and the Role of Compliance Costs in the Agricultural Sector: Exports to the EU," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 652-679.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:61:y:2010:i:3:p:652-679

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nilsson, Lars & Dotter, Caroline, 2012. "Small flows, compliance costs and trade preferences: The case of EU imports from African LDCs," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-29.
    2. Demaria, Federica & Drogue, Sophie & Rau, Marie Luise, 2015. "EU preferences for agri-food products from developing countries- winning and losing due to the EU GSP reform 2013," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211568, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Mariarosaria Agostino & Francesco Trivieri, 2016. "European Wines Exports Towards Emerging Markets. The Role of Geographical Identity," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 233-256, June.
    4. Agostino, Mariarosaria & Trivieri, Francesco, 2014. "Geographical indication and wine exports. An empirical investigation considering the major European producers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 22-36.
    5. Keck, Alexander & Lendle, Andreas, 2012. "New evidence on preference utilization," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2012-12, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.

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