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Modelling Farmer Entry into the Environmentally Sensitive Area Schemes in Scotland

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  • Gerard Wynn
  • Bob Crabtree
  • Jacqueline Potts

Abstract

The probability and rate of farmer entry into the Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) scheme were investigated by multinomial logit and duration analysis respectively. Models were based on a survey of 490 farmers sampled from across all ten ESAs in Scotland. The results indicated a number of generic factors as important in explaining the entry decision. Non‐entrants were less aware of and less informed about the scheme than entrants. The probability of entry was increased where the scheme prescription fitted the farm situation and the costs of compliance were low. The duration analysis suggested several factors accelerating scheme entry: an interest in conservation, more adequate information and more extensive systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerard Wynn & Bob Crabtree & Jacqueline Potts, 2001. "Modelling Farmer Entry into the Environmentally Sensitive Area Schemes in Scotland," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 65-82, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:52:y:2001:i:1:p:65-82
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1477-9552.2001.tb00910.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1477-9552.2001.tb00910.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Martin Whitby, 2000. "Challenges and Options for the UK Agri‐Environment: Presidential Address," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 317-332, September.
    5. Cramer, J. S. & Ridder, G., 1991. "Pooling states in the multinomial logit model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 267-272, February.
    6. Geoff Wilson, 1997. "Selective Targeting in Environmentally Sensitive Areas: Implications for Farmers and the Environment," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 199-216.
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