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The Economic Status of Areas Surrounding Major U.S. Container Ports: Evidence and Policy Issues

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  • LISA M. GROBAR

Abstract

This article examines the current economic status of the areas surrounding major U.S. container ports. We define a "port district" as the geographic area within a 7.5-mile radius of a port. Our sample includes the 10 largest container ports in the U.S. We find that when we compare port districts to their surrounding metropolitan areas, household unemployment and poverty rates are significantly higher in port districts. Thus, the same ports that serve as "economic engines" for the region and nation may be the cause of economic decline and deterioration in the immediate areas that surround them. This presents a challenge for policy makers who want to preserve the benefits of international trade while facing increasing opposition to port expansion by local communities. Copyright (c) 2008 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

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  • Lisa M. Grobar, 2008. "The Economic Status of Areas Surrounding Major U.S. Container Ports: Evidence and Policy Issues," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3), pages 497-516.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:39:y:2008:i:3:p:497-516
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    1. Markus Hesse, 2006. "Global Chain, Local Pain: Regional Implications of Global Distribution Networks in the German North Range," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 570-596.
    2. Thomas, Jonathan M., 1998. "Ethnic Variation in Commuting Propensity and Unemployment Spells: Some U.K. Evidence," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 385-400, May.
    3. Michael A. Stoll & Harry J. Holzer & Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, 2000. "Within cities and suburbs: Racial residential concentration and the spatial distribution of employment opportunities across sub-metropolitan areas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 207-231.
    4. Donald Houston, 2005. "Employability, Skills Mismatch and Spatial Mismatch in Metropolitan Labour Markets," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 42(2), pages 221-243, February.
    5. Raphael, Steven, 1998. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis and Black Youth Joblessness: Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 79-111, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. César Ducruet & Hidekazu Itoh & Olivier Joly, 2015. "Ports and the local embedding of commodity flows," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(3), pages 607-627, August.
    2. Deng, Ping & Lu, Shiqing & Xiao, Hanbin, 2013. "Evaluation of the relevance measure between ports and regional economy using structural equation modeling," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 123-133.
    3. Adolf K.Y. Ng & Zaili Yang & Stephen Cahoon & Paul T.W. Lee & Paul Tae-Woo Lee & Jei-Zheng Wu & Kamonchanok Suthiwartnarueput & Kai-Chieh Hu & Rahuth Rodjanapradied, 2016. "A Comparative Study of Key Critical Factors of Waterfront Port Development: Case Studies of the Incheon and Bangkok Ports," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 393-405, September.
    4. Bottasso, Anna & Conti, Maurizio & Ferrari, Claudio & Tei, Alessio, 2014. "Ports and regional development: A spatial analysis on a panel of European regions," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 44-55.
    5. repec:eee:retrec:v:61:y:2017:i:c:p:2-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Bottasso, Anna & Conti, Maurizio & Ferrari, Claudio & Merk, Olaf & Tei, Alessio, 2013. "The impact of port throughput on local employment: Evidence from a panel of European regions," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 32-38.
    7. Park, Jin Suk & Seo, Young-Joon, 2016. "The impact of seaports on the regional economies in South Korea: Panel evidence from the augmented Solow model," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 107-119.
    8. César Ducruet & Hidekazu Itoh, 2016. "Regions and material flows: investigating the regional branching and industry relatedness of port traffics in a global perspective," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 805-830.

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