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Mismatch, Transport Mode and Search Decisions in England

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  • Patacchini, Eleonora
  • Zenou, Yves

Abstract

We develop a theoretical model in which whites mainly use private vehicles to commute whereas non-whites use public transportation. We show that, for whites and non-whites, higher (time) distance-to-jobs leads to lower search effort. Because of different transport modes, we also show that, at exactly the same (time) distance-to-jobs, white unemployed workers search more intensively than non-whites because it less costly for them to gather information about jobs. We then test this model using English sub-regional data. We find that, for each race, living in areas where distance-to-jobs is higher means the unemployed search less than in areas with better job access. We also find that having access to a car increases search intensity for both whites and non-whites. Finally, closing the racial gap in car access and distance-to-jobs would considerably narrow the difference in search intensities between whites and non-whites.

Suggested Citation

  • Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2003. "Mismatch, Transport Mode and Search Decisions in England," CEPR Discussion Papers 3968, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3968
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Gobillon & Harris Selod & Yves Zenou, 2007. "The Mechanisms of Spatial Mismatch," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(12), pages 2401-2427, November.
    2. Olof Åslund & John Östh & Yves Zenou, 2010. "How important is access to jobs? Old question--improved answer," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 389-422, May.
    3. Wrede, Matthias, 2011. "Unemployment, commuting, and search intensity," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 12/2011, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ethnic minorities; job access; job search; spatial econometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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