IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/etrans/v12y2004i3p509-536.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Relative price shifts, economies of scale and poverty during economic transition

Author

Listed:
  • Jean O. Lanjouw
  • Peter Lanjouw
  • Branko Milanovic
  • Stefano Paternostro

Abstract

Economic transition is associated with significant shifts in relative prices between private and public goods. If, as a result, public goods claim a larger share of total expenditures, economies of scale in consumption increase. We show how relative price changes might alter the welfare of different-sized households in the short run and over time. We illustrate, for a selection of transition economies, that conventional poverty profiles are quite sensitive to assumptions made about economies of scale in consumption. In particular, the common view that large households with many children are poor relative to small households (such as those comprising the elderly) is shown to be highly non-robust. Copyright (c) The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean O. Lanjouw & Peter Lanjouw & Branko Milanovic & Stefano Paternostro, 2004. "Relative price shifts, economies of scale and poverty during economic transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 12(3), pages 509-536, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:12:y:2004:i:3:p:509-536
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=ecot&volume=12&issue=3&year=2004&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Branko Milanovic, 2005. "Global Income Inequality: What It Is And Why It Matters?," HEW 0512001, EconWPA.
    2. Tilman Brück1 & Alexander Danzer & Alexander Muravyev & Natalia Weißhaar, 2007. "Determinants Of Poverty During Transition: Household Survey Evidence From Ukraine," PRUS Working Papers 40, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    3. Brooks Evans & Robert Palacios, 2015. "Who is Poorer?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 24992, The World Bank.
    4. Deon Filmer & Kinnon Scott, 2012. "Assessing Asset Indices," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 359-392, February.
    5. Ling Li & Qiulin Chen & Yu Jiang, 2011. "The changing patterns of China's public services," Chapters,in: Population Aging and the Generational Economy, chapter 22 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Vandeninden, Frieda, 2012. "A Simulation of Social Pensions in Europe," MERIT Working Papers 008, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Zsoka Koczan, 2016. "Being Poor, Feeling Poorer; Inequality, Poverty and Poverty Perceptions in the Western Balkans," IMF Working Papers 16/31, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Brück, Tilman & Danzer, Alexander M. & Muravyev, Alexander & Weisshaar, Natalia, 2010. "Poverty during transition: Household survey evidence from Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 123-145, June.
    9. Leonardo Menchini & Gerry Redmond, 2006. "Child Consumption Poverty in South-Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States," Papers inwopa06/36, Innocenti Working Papers.
    10. Xin Meng & Xiaodong Gong & Youjuan Wang, 2009. "Impact of Income Growth and Economic Reform on Nutrition Availability in Urban China: 1986-2000," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(2), pages 261-295, January.
    11. Jean-Jacques Dethier & Pierre Pestieau & Rabia Ali, 2011. "The impact of a minimum pension on old age poverty and its budgetary cost. Evidence from Latin America," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:12:y:2004:i:3:p:509-536. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ebrdduk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.