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Financial Constraints and Job Mobility in Australia

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  • BEN LODEWIJKS

Abstract

This article examines the effect of financial constraints on job mobility in Australia. After specifying a simple job search model which shows that the effect of wealth on job mobility is theoretically unclear, empirical analysis is undertaken using the first six waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey. The analysis indicates that men under the age of 40 with low levels of household wealth, liquidity and financial satisfaction are significantly more likely to engage in job–job transitions. However, financial constraints have no significant impact on job mobility decisions for women or older men.

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Lodewijks, 2011. "Financial Constraints and Job Mobility in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(276), pages 61-75, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:87:y:2011:i:276:p:61-75
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1475-4932.2010.00682.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    D31 ; I31 ; J62 ;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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