IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jlabec/v5y1987i4p533-60.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Quit Propensity of Married Men

Author

Listed:
  • Shaw, Kathryn L

Abstract

This paper hypothesizes that the quit propensity of married men rises with an increase in their wives' income. Assuming that individuals are risk averse and that quitting is risky, the wife's income increases the husband's expected value of quitting by reducing the variance of expected family income. Using the longit udinal data from the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the wif e's income is found to have a large effect on quits. The average husb and's quit rate increases by about 45 percent when the wife's income rises from zero to two-thirds that of the husband's. The wife's incom e effect nearly offsets the negative effect that marriage typically h as on male quit rates. Copyright 1987 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Shaw, Kathryn L, 1987. "The Quit Propensity of Married Men," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(4), pages 533-560, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:4:p:533-60
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/298160
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers. See http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Steven Stillman, 2000. "Labor Market Uncertainty and Private Sector Labor Supply in Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 359, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. William M. Rodgers & Leslie S. Stratton, 2010. "Male Marital Wage Differentials: Training, Personal Characteristics, And Fixed Effects," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 722-742, July.
    3. Campbell, Carl III, 1995. "A cross-industry time-series analysis of quits," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 53-72.
    4. Ben Lodewijks, 2011. "Financial Constraints and Job Mobility in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(276), pages 61-75, March.
    5. Rodgers III, William M. & Stratton, Leslie S., 2005. "The Male Marital Wage Differential: Race, Training, and Fixed Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 1745, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. repec:mpr:mprres:f04e33e27f994275b99d5fde53a20f57 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kevin T. Stroupe & Eleanor D. Kinney & Thomas J.J. Kniesner, 2001. "Chronic Illness and Health Insurance-Related Job Lock," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 525-544.
    8. Chami, Ralph & Fischer, Jeffrey H., 2000. "Do private income transfers increase labor market risk?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 143-151, November.
    9. Kracke, Nancy & Reichelt, Malte & Vicari, Basha, 2017. "Wage losses due to overqualification: The role of formal degrees and occupational skills," IAB Discussion Paper 201710, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    10. Charles Brown & Greg J. Duncan & Frank P. Stafford, 1996. "Data Watch: The Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 155-168, Spring.
    11. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "New Estimates on the Effect of Parental Separation on Child Health," Working Papers 0719, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:5:y:1987:i:4:p:533-60. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.