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Do the rich stay unemployed longer? An empirical study for the U.K

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  • Stancanelli, E.G.F.

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of individual asset holdings on the probability of leaving unemployment. According to the theory, higher levels of financial wealth will result in higher reservation wages and longer unemployment durations. I estimate the impact of beginning of period financial assets on the hazard rate, using data drawn from a UK inflow sample of the unemployed. The empirical findings indicate that individual asset holdings affect significantly the escape rate out of unemployment. In particular, negative levels of wealth increase significantly the hazard of leaving unemployment while positive levels of wealth reduce significantly the probability of leaving unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • Stancanelli, E.G.F., 1997. "Do the rich stay unemployed longer? An empirical study for the U.K," Discussion Paper 97.81, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:7d49af89-0cc0-418e-85c7-7c91c7fc7275
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    Cited by:

    1. Bloemen, Hans G. & Stancanelli, Elena G.F., 2001. "Financial wealth, consumption smoothing, and income shocks due to job loss," Serie Research Memoranda 0036, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    2. Bauer, Christian, 2011. "On the reservation wage under CARA and limited borrowing," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 126-129, September.
    3. Ben Lodewijks, 2011. "Financial Constraints and Job Mobility in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(276), pages 61-75, March.
    4. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley & Eric F. Smith, 2007. "Asset Accumulation and Short Term Employment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 400-423, July.
    5. Mário Centeno & Álvaro A. Novo, 2014. "Do Low-Wage Workers React Less to Longer Unemployment Benefits? Quasi-Experimental Evidence," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(2), pages 185-207, April.
    6. Namkee Ahn & José Ignacio García-Pérez, 2002. "Unemployment duration and workers' wage aspirations in Spain," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 103-118.
    7. Tricia Gladden & Michelle Alexopoulos, 2004. "The Effects of Wealth, and Unemployment Benefits on Search Behavior and Labor Market Transitions," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 517, Econometric Society.
    8. Bloemen, Hans, 2006. "The Impact of Wealth on Job Exit Rates of Elderly Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 2247, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Yann Algan & Antoine Terracol, 2001. "L'influence de l'épargne de précaution sur la recherche d'emploi," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 349(1), pages 63-76.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; duration analysis; labour economics;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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