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Environmental Protection and the Private Provision of International Public Goods

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  • MARTIN ALTEMEYER-BARTSCHER
  • DIRK T. G. RÜBBELKE
  • EYTAN SHESHINSKI

Abstract

International environmental protection like the combat of global warming exhibits properties of public goods. In the international arena, no coercive authority exists that can enforce measures to overcome free-rider incentives. Therefore decentralized negotiations between individual regions serve as an approach to pursue efficient international environmental protection. We propose a scheme which is based on the ideas of Coasean negotiations and Pigouvian taxes. The negotiating entities offer side-payments to counterparts in order to influence their taxation of polluting consumption. Side-payments, in turn, are self-financed by means of externality-correcting taxes. As we show, a Pareto-efficient outcome can be attained. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Altemeyer-Bartscher & Dirk T. G. Rübbelke & Eytan Sheshinski, 2010. "Environmental Protection and the Private Provision of International Public Goods," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(308), pages 775-784, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:77:y:2010:i:308:p:775-784
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kimiko Terai, 2012. "Financial Mechanism and Enforceability of International Environmental Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 53(2), pages 297-308, October.
    2. Karen Pittel & Dirk Rübbelke, 2012. "Transitions in the negotiations on climate change: from prisoner’s dilemma to chicken and beyond," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 23-39, March.
    3. repec:kap:enreec:v:67:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10640-017-0162-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Boadway, Robin & Song, Zhen & Tremblay, Jean-François, 2013. "Non-cooperative pollution control in an inter-jurisdictional setting," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 783-796.
    5. Massimiliano Corradini & Valeria Costantini & Massimiliano Mazzanti & Susanna Mancinelli, 2014. "Linking innovation investment and environmental performance: an impure dynamic public good model," SEEDS Working Papers 0814, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Apr 2014.
    6. Benjamin Jones & Michael Keen & Jon Strand, 2013. "Fiscal implications of climate change," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(1), pages 29-70, February.
    7. Boadway, Robin & Song, Zhen & Tremblay, Jean-François, 2011. "The efficiency of voluntary pollution abatement when countries can commit," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 352-368, June.
    8. Eleni Stathopoulou, 2014. "Environmental campaigns and endogenous technology choice under international oligopoly," Discussion Papers in Economics 14/10, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    9. Olga Kiuila, 2011. "Interactions between trade and environmental policies in the Czech economy," Working Papers 2011-16, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    10. Martin Altemeyer-Bartscher & Anil Markandya & Dirk T.G. Rübbelke, 2011. "The Private Provision of International Impure Public Goods: the Case of Climate Policy," Working Papers 2011-09, BC3.
    11. Massimiliano Corradini & Valeria Costantini & Susanna Mancinelli & Massimiliano Mazzanti, 2015. "Interacting innovation investments and environmental performances: a dynamic impure public good model," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(1), pages 109-129, January.

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