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Relative performance of two simple incentive mechanisms in a public good experiment

  • Juergen Bracht
  • Charles Figuieres
  • Marisa Ratto

    ()

This paper reports on experiments designed to compare the performance of two incentive mechanisms in public goods problems. One mechanism rewards and penalizes deviations from the average contribution of the other agents to the public good (tax-subsidy mechanism). Another mechanism allows agents to subsidize the other agents’contributions (compensation mechanism). It is found that both mechanisms lead to an increase in the level of contribution to the public good. The tax-subsidy mechanism allows for good point and interval prediction of the average level of contribution. The compensation mechanism allows for less reliable prediction of the average level of contributions.

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File URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp102.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 04/102.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: May 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:04/102
Contact details of provider: Postal: 2 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX
Phone: 0117 33 10799
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Web page: http://www.bris.ac.uk/cmpo/
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